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The Responsibility of International Organizations and the International Law Commission
 
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The Responsibility of International Organizations and the International Law Commission: A Conversation between Professors Georg Nolte, member of the International Law Commission, and José E. Alvarez, NYU The responsibility of international organizations has been an important concern of the international community for some years. In 2011, the International Law Commission adopted the "Draft Articles on Responsibility of International Organizations." These articles will be debated in the UN General Assembly's Sixth Committee. In addition, cases before the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights (in particular Kadi/Behrami/Al-Skeini/Al-Jedda) have raised significant questions about the human rights obligations of the United Nations as well as member states cooperating with UN actions. Such questions have arisen in the course of implementing UN sanctions or undertaking UN peacekeeping operations. Have the ILC and international judges asked the right questions and reached the right answers with respect to allocating responsibility on the UN? What is the International Law Commission's role in resolving such issues? Prof. Georg Nolte, member of the International Law Commission, and Prof. J.E. Alvarez, the Herbert and Rose Rubin Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, addressed these issues in the form of a conversation at New York University School of Law.
Views: 9543 NYU School of Law
What is STATE RESPONSIBILITY? What does STATE RESPONSIBILITY mean? STATE RESPONSIBILITY meaning
 
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What is STATE RESPONSIBILITY? What does STATE RESPONSIBILITY mean? STATE RESPONSIBILITY meaning - STATE RESPONSIBILITY definition - STATE RESPONSIBILITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The laws of state responsibility are the principles governing when and how a state is held responsible for a breach of an international obligation. Rather than set forth any particular obligations, the rules of state responsibility determine, in general, when an obligation has been breached and the legal consequences of that violation. In this way they are "secondary" rules that address basic issues of responsibility and remedies available for breach of "primary" or substantive rules of international law, such as with respect to the use of armed force. Because of this generality, the rules can be studied independently of the primary rules of obligation. They establish (1) the conditions of actions to qualify as internationally wrongful, (2) the circumstances under which actions of officials, private individuals and other entities may be attributed to the state, (3) general defences to liability and (4) the consequences of liability. Until recently, the theory of the law of state responsibility was not well developed. The position has now changed, with the adoption of the Draft Articles on the Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts ("Draft Articles") by the International Law Commission (ILC) in August 2001. The Draft Articles are a combination of codification and progressive development. They have already been cited by the International Court of Justice and have generally been well received. Although the articles are general in coverage, they do not necessarily apply in all cases. Particular treaty regimes, such as the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the European Convention on Human Rights, have established their own special rules of responsibility.
Views: 3507 The Audiopedia
What Makes a Great International Law Article
 
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ASIL's New Professionals Interest Group hosts a luncheon panel to discuss what qualities constitute great international law scholarship. The panel consists of American Journal of International Law (AJIL) editors Dinah Shelton and David P. Stewart, as well as Journal Managing Editor Julie Furgerson.
Views: 1700 asil1906
Conversation With Professor of International Law, Dr. Francis Boyle
 
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Francis Boyle is a professor of international law at the University of Illinois College of Law, with—among many degrees—a PhD in Political Science from Harvard University. See his full biography here: https://law.illinois.edu/faculty-research/faculty-profiles/francis-boyle We recently had the chance to speak on a number of important, current issues, including Syria, Yemen, the DPRK, or North Korea, and the failure of supposedly alternative media. RELATED LINKS: The Haircut: https://youtu.be/2BO83Ig-E8E https://www.patreon.com/posts/interview-with-14579589 Trump threatening the DPRK: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/trump-un-north-korean-leader-suicide-mission-n802596 https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/09/19/remarks-president-trump-72nd-session-united-nations-general-assembly UN Charter article 33: http://www.un.org/en/sections/un-charter/chapter-vi/index.html Ken Roth tweets: https://twitter.com/kenroth/status/597005125018906625 http://www.brandonturbeville.com/2017/01/that-time-hrws-ken-roth-contradicted.html http://www.handsoffsyriasydney.com/articles/ken-roth-keeps-on-digging/#_blank Amnesty International: Imperialist Tool http://www.countercurrents.org/boyle231012.htm Democracy Now & Counter Punch Shills For War: https://www.democracynow.org/2011/9/14/after_gaddafis_fall_a_revitalized_libya#transcript https://www.globalresearch.ca/democracy-now-and-the-progressive-alternative-media-valued-cheerleaders-for-imperialism-and-war/31874 http://www.wrongkindofgreen.org/2017/05/09/democracy-now-launches-anti-syria-propaganda-campaign/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPp8eKBjcyA https://www.counterpunch.org/2016/10/20/syria-and-the-left-time-to-break-the-silence/ https://gowans.wordpress.com/2016/10/22/the-revolutionary-distemper-in-syria-that-wasnt/ https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/05/05/the-last-men-in-aleppo/ https://www.counterpunch.org/2016/08/26/anti-imperialism-and-the-syrian-revolution/ https://ingaza.wordpress.com/2017/01/28/those-who-transmit-syrian-voices-are-russian-propagandists-monitors-of-fake-news-negate-syrian-suffering/ Attack on Global Research: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/nato-research-centre-sets-sights-on-canadian-website-over-pro-russian-disinformation/article37015521/ http://www.radio4all.net/files/[email protected]/16-1-NATOsilencingGlobalResearch.mp3 CBC Pushing Long-Debunked Bana Story http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-october-31-2017-1.4378789/7-year-old-syrian-girl-who-tweeted-from-aleppo-shares-her-story-in-new-book-1.4378794 https://www.facebook.com/notes/ken-stone/cbc-continues-child-exploitation-of-bana-alabed-of-syria/1949057578748238/?hc_ref=ARSN4hftjOvn7AkbmyW96XASLoFBSsdR6HJQh7lg0JvMvtECjUdR25GcFh7rUErSWsc https://www.rt.com/op-edge/397339-bana-abed-syria-aleppo-twitter/ https://archive.is/20161203133922/https:/twitter.com/alabedbana/status/781597903924125697 https://twitter.com/AlabedBana/status/916739311176953856 https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=572&v=ydCy4sct1fg http://theduran.com/idlib-school-attack-and-how-the-un-covers-up-actual-war-crimes-citing-al-qaeda-propagandists-in-syria/ Countering War Propaganda: https://www.rt.com/op-edge/408618-syria-war-propaganda-media-west/ https://ingaza.wordpress.com/2017/09/03/syria-war-diary-what-life-is-like-under-moderate-rebel-rule/ http://www.mintpressnews.com/order-returns-to-western-syria-civilians-recount-horrors-rebel-rule/232380/ http://www.ipsnews.net/2014/07/liberated-homs-residents-challenge-notion-of-revolution/ https://ingaza.wordpress.com/2014/06/13/homs-we-wanted-to-protect-our-house/ https://ingaza.wordpress.com/2014/06/24/freedom/ https://www.facebook.com/vanessa.beeley https://twitter.com/VanessaBeeley http://21stcenturywire.com/author/21vbeeley/ http://21stcenturywire.com/2017/12/02/white-helmets-local-councils-uk-fco-financing-terrorism-syria-taxpayer-funds/ Busting Chemical Weapons Claims: https://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n24/seymour-m-hersh/whose-sarin https://www.welt.de/politik/ausland/article165905578/Trump-s-Red-Line.html Prof. Boyle in Anti-War Panel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OrPE6ZQgEI&feature=youtu.be On Yemen: https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201703311052146668-us-saudis-yemen-genocide/ http://21stcenturywire.com/2017/09/21/vanessa-beeley-yemen-saudi-us-now-guilty-war-crimes/ http://www.balkanspost.com/article/389/analysis-american-allegations-iranian-missiles-yemen http://www.globalresearch.ca/not-tweetworthy-un-selectively-tweeting-syrian-villages-ignores-foua-kafarya-nubl-zahara/5501694 https://twitter.com/UN/status/916695639072808962 http://21stcenturywire.com/2016/09/06/syria-the-children-of-kafarya-and-foua-are-crying-in-the-dark/
Views: 1549 Eva K Bartlett
International Court of Justice under United Nations Lecture 15
 
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Introduction - Establishment, Seat, Membership, Role Law applied by ICJ - Article 38 Binding Force of ICJ Jurisdiction of ICJ Contentious Advisory Court power to allow third party - Article 62 Problem of enforcement of judgements of ICJ Contribution of ICJ
Views: 2851 Vineet Kumar NET/JRF
Use of force
 
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Views: 12768 djaguilfoyle
Introduction to State Responsibility, Part 1
 
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Introduction to State Responsibility, Part 1 http://www.screenr.com/kci
Views: 16075 djaguilfoyle
Sources of International law
 
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According to article 38 of Statute of the International Court of Justice there are five sources of international law. 1. Treaties 2. Customs 3. General Principles of law 4. Judicial Decisions 5. Juristic works
Views: 95314 LAW Notes
Rules of war (in a nutshell)
 
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Yes, even wars have laws. To find out more, visit http://therulesofwar.org ******** Rules of War in a Nutshell - script Since the beginning, humans have resorted to violence as a way to settle disagreements. Yet through the ages, people from around the world have tried to limit the brutality of war. It was this humanitarian spirit that led to the First Geneva Convention of 1864,and to the birth of modern International Humanitarian Law. Setting the basic limits on how wars can be fought, these universal laws of war protect those not fighting, as well as those no longer able to. To do this, a distinction must always be made between who or what may be attacked, and who or what must be spared and protected. - CIVILIANS - Most importantly, civilians can never be targeted. To do so is a war crime. “When they drove into our village, they shouted that they were going to kill everyone. I was so scared, I ran to hide in the bush. I heard my mother screaming. I thought I would never see her again.” Every possible care must be taken to avoid harming civilians or destroying things essential for their survival. They have a right to receive the help they need. - DETAINEES - “The conditions prisoners lived in never used to bother me. People like him were the reason my brother was dead. He was the enemy and was nothing to me. But then I realized that behind bars, he was out of action and no longer a threat to me or my family.” The laws of war prohibit torture and other ill-treatment of detainees, whatever their past. They must be given food and water and allowed to communicate with loved ones. This preserves their dignity and keeps them alive. - SICK & WOUNDED - Medical workers save lives, sometimes in the most dangerous conditions. “Several fighters from both sides had been critically wounded in a fierce battle and we were taking them to the closest hospital. At a checkpoint, a soldier threatened us, demanding that we only treat his men. Time was running out and I was afraid they were all going to die.” Medical workers must always be allowed to do their job and the Red Cross or Red Crescent must not be attacked. The sick or wounded have a right to be cared for, regardless of whose side they are on. - LIMITS TO WARFARE - Advances in weapons technology has meant that the rules of war have also had to adapt. Because some weapons and methods of warfare don't distinguish between fighters and civilians, limits on their use have been agreed. In the future, wars may be fought with fully autonomous robots. But will such robots ever have the ability to distinguish between a military target and someone who must never be attacked? No matter how sophisticated weapons become it is essential that they are in line with the rules of war. International Humanitarian Law is all about making choices that preserve a minimum of human dignity in times of war, and makes sure that living together again is possible once the last bullet has been shot.
Prof. Alain PELLET - interview (International Law in a Multipolar World - ASIL 107th Annual Meeting)
 
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http://www.alainpellet.eu/Pages/default.aspx http://www.alainpellet.eu/Pages/Enligne.aspx http://www.alainpellet.eu/Pages/Articles.aspx
Views: 1777 Kawabi
What Laws Apply In International Waters?
 
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Pope Francis recently granted sainthood to two 19th century Palestinian nuns. So we were wondering what are the qualifications for becoming a saint? » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Learn More: Pope Francis Is Making Saints Out Of Two Palestinian Nuns http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/13/pope-francis-saints-palestinian-nuns_n_7260252.html "Pope Francis will bestow sainthood on two Palestinian nuns on Sunday (May 17), a move that's being seen as giving hope to the conflict-wracked Middle East and shining the spotlight on the plight of Christians in the region." How does someone become a saint? http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-27140646 "Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII are to be declared saints by the Catholic Church." Is Mother Teresa's Miracle for Real? http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2003/10/is_mother_teresas_miracle_for_real.html "On Sunday, Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Teresa of Calcutta, bringing her one step closer to sainthood." _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld Special thanks to Lissette Padilla for hosting TestTube! Check Lissette out on Twitter:https://twitter.com/lizzette
Views: 272300 NowThis World
Immunity of State Officials / UN International Law Commission - Sir Michael Wood
 
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Manchester International Law Centre (MILC), Melland Schill Lecture. Sir Michael Wood speaking on 22 November 2017 at The University of Manchester. "The UN International Law Commission: Lessons from the topic Immunity of State Officials."
United Nations Charter
 
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The Charter of the United Nations is the foundational treaty of the international organization called the United Nations. It was signed at the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center in San Francisco, United States, on 26 June 1945, by 50 of the 51 original member countries. (Poland, the other original member, which was not represented at the conference, signed it two months later.) It entered into force on 24 October 1945, after being ratified by the five permanent members of the Security Council—the Republic of China under Chapter II of the United Nations Charter (and currently by the People's Republic of China), France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (later replaced by the Russian Federation), the United Kingdom, and the United States—and a majority of the other signatories. As a charter, it is a constituent treaty, and all members are bound by its articles. Furthermore, Article 103 of the Charter states that obligations to the United Nations prevail over all other treaty obligations. Most countries in the world have now ratified the Charter. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 20462 Audiopedia
Subjects of International Law explained | Lex Animata
 
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Subjects of International Law explained | Lex Animata By Hesham Elrafei https://www.linkedin.com/in/heshamelrafei States and non-State actors like individuals, international organizations, multinational companies and international non-government organizations are regulated by, or subjected to, international law. They are called subjects of international law. These subjects have international legal personality.
Views: 40062 Hesham Elrafei
Most important questions and fact of  UN charter and international law part-1
 
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All the important facts and questions of international law hav been provided in this video..
An Introduction to Rethinking International Law
 
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As of late, strong questions have surfaced surrounding the future of international law. Is globalisation undermining notions of state sovereignty, ushering in a post-sovereign period of global governance? Is human rights discourse incurably Eurocentric, negating its future as an emancipatory vehicle? Have the latest Anglo-American invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan or NATO's campaign of destruction-cum-protection against Libya rung the death knell of Article 2(4) of the UN Charter? And what of the world economy and the retreat, possibly temporary, from meta-regulatory regimes triggered by the recession and by domestic protectionist pressures (increasingly fomented by chauvinistic populism)? In this course, we will link geopolitics to international law, with the aim of evaluating the interplay between legal, illegal, and extra-legal activities and their impact upon state action. A critical lens will help us appreciate how geopolitical considerations are frequently used by states to justify plunder, often in defiance of international legal obligations. We will conclude with an assessment of legitimacy standards in international law and the place of democracy in possible legal reformation.In the following clip, I explain why I chose to title the course a 'rethink' of international law and provide an overview of the topics that will be covered throughout the semester. In the following clip, I explain why I chose to title the course a 'rethink' of international law and provide an overview of the topics that will be covered throughout the semester.
Views: 1553 mohsenalattar1
William Saunders - Human Rights and International Law
 
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Bill Saunders of Americans United For Life discusses Human Rights and How International Law Affects US Courts. He discusses two important documents, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the San Jose Articles of which he is one of the signers of. Don't forget to hit subscribe! The PIE Project http://thePIEproject.org http://www.youtube.com/THEprojectPIE http://www.facebook.com/thePIEproject Americans United for Life http://www.AUL.org http://www.youtube.com/aulvids http://www.facebook.com/AmericansUnitedforLife Twitter: @AUL (http://www.twitter.com/aul) -- The Universal Declaration of Human Rights http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml The San Jose Articles http://www.SanJoseArticles.com/
Views: 198 TheProjectPIE
All ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS
 
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Video : All About Human Rights ml Corrections: Fundamental Rights are the basic rights of the people and the charter of rights contained in Part III(Article 12 to 35) of Constitution of India. It guarantees civil liberties such that all Indians can lead their lives in peace and harmony as citizens of India. About Human Rights: The doctrine of human rights has been highly influential within international law, global and regional institutions.Actions by states and non-governmental organisations form a basis of public policy worldwide. The idea of human rights[8]suggests that "if the public discourse of peacetime global society can be said to have a common moral language, it is that of human rights". The strong claims made by the doctrine of human rights continue to provoke considerable scepticism and debates about the content, nature and justifications of human rights to this day. The precise meaning of the term right is controversial and is the subject of continued philosophical debate; while there is consensus that human rights encompasses a wide variety of rights such as the right to a fair trial, protection against enslavement, prohibition of genocide, free speech, or a right to education, there is disagreement about which of these particular rights should be included within the general framework of human rights; some thinkers suggest that human rights should be a minimum requirement to avoid the worst-case abuses, while others see it as a higher standard. Who is "MJ Sir" : ---------------+++++----------------------- Mr. Manmohan Joshi is known as "MJ Sir" among students. Mr. Joshi is an advocate by profession and a teacher by passion, a renowned scholar of law, Author of best seller books, Motivator, thinker, educationist, blogger, youtuber, traveller and entrepreneur. Academic Qualifications: B.Sc., LL.M, MBA Work Experience: As an Entrepreneur: Working as a CEO with Kautilya Academy. As an author: 11 books has been published so far in various subjects of law including two best seller “ Translation and summarization for judicial services” and “121 Legal and Social Essays”. As a research scholar: Till Dec -2017 eleven research papers has been published in various national and international law journals. As a key note speaker : till Dec 2017 delivered lectures in 200 plus colleges in various issues i.e.: Women Empowerment, Career Options, Personality Development, Stress management, Time Management, Goal setting etc. Awards and Achievements: 1) Awarded with Education excellence award 2014', 2015, 2016 and 2017 2) Appreciated by Hon Governor MP for one of his books named “SC and ST Prevention of atrocities act -1989” 3) Utkrisht Lekhan Samman, And Various other awards for his works. Stay connected with Mr Joshi: Email & Contact- [email protected] Facebook: www.facebook.com/manmohanjoshi.09 Twitter: @manmohanjoshi Youtube: www.youtube.com/manmohanjoshi Blog: mannkidiarykepanne.blogspot.com
The 30 Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
 
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UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS Simplified Version This simplified version of the 30 Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has been created especially for young people. 1. We Are All Born Free & Equal. We are all born free. We all have our own thoughts and ideas. We should all be treated in the same way. 2. Don't Discriminate. These rights belong to everybody, whatever our differences. 3. The Right to Life. We all have the right to life, and to live in freedom and safety. 4. No Slavery. Nobody has any right to make us a slave. We cannot make anyone our slave. 5. No Torture. Nobody has any right to hurt us or to torture us. 6. You Have Rights No Matter Where You Go. I am a person just like you! 7. We're All Equal Before the Law. The law is the same for everyone. It must treat us all fairly. 8. Your Human Rights Are Protected by Law. We can all ask for the law to help us when we are not treated fairly. 9. No Unfair Detainment. Nobody has the right to put us in prison without good reason and keep us there, or to send us away from our country. 10. The Right to Trial. If we are put on trial this should be in public. The people who try us should not let anyone tell them what to do. 11. We're Always Innocent Till Proven Guilty. Nobody should be blamed for doing something until it is proven. When people say we did a bad thing we have the right to show it is not true. 12. The Right to Privacy. Nobody should try to harm our good name. Nobody has the right to come into our home, open our letters, or bother us or our family without a good reason. 13. Freedom to Move. We all have the right to go where we want in our own country and to travel as we wish. 14. The Right to Seek a Safe Place to Live. If we are frightened of being badly treated in our own country, we all have the right to run away to another country to be safe. 15. Right to a Nationality. We all have the right to belong to a country. 16. Marriage and Family. Every grown-up has the right to marry and have a family if they want to. Men and women have the same rights when they are married, and when they are separated. 17. The Right to Your Own Things. Everyone has the right to own things or share them. Nobody should take our things from us without a good reason. 18. Freedom of Thought. We all have the right to believe in what we want to believe, to have a religion, or to change it if we want. 19. Freedom of Expression. We all have the right to make up our own minds, to think what we like, to say what we think, and to share our ideas with other people. 20. The Right to Public Assembly. We all have the right to meet our friends and to work together in peace to defend our rights. Nobody can make us join a group if we don't want to. 21. The Right to Democracy. We all have the right to take part in the government of our country. Every grown-up should be allowed to choose their own leaders. 22. Social Security. We all have the right to affordable housing, medicine, education, and childcare, enough money to live on and medical help if we are ill or old. 23. Workers' Rights. Every grown-up has the right to do a job, to a fair wage for their work, and to join a trade union. 24. The Right to Play. We all have the right to rest from work and to relax. 25. Food and Shelter for All. We all have the right to a good life. Mothers and children, people who are old, unemployed or disabled, and all people have the right to be cared for. 26. The Right to Education. Education is a right. Primary school should be free. We should learn about the United Nations and how to get on with others. Our parents can choose what we learn. 27. Copyright. Copyright is a special law that protects one's own artistic creations and writings; others cannot make copies without permission. We all have the right to our own way of life and to enjoy the good things that art, science and learning bring. 28. A Fair and Free World. There must be proper order so we can all enjoy rights and freedoms in our own country and all over the world. 29. Responsibility. We have a duty to other people, and we should protect their rights and freedoms. 30. No One Can Take Away Your Human Rights.
Views: 333353 CoursesinIreland
History of international law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of international law 00:01:08 1 Early history 00:02:51 2 Nation-states 00:04:33 3 Hugo Grotius 00:06:26 4 Treaty of Westphalia 00:09:50 5 The League of Nations 00:10:57 6 The postwar era 00:12:19 7 Modern customary international law 00:13:51 8 Modern treaty law 00:15:50 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of international law examines the evolution and development of public international law in both state practice and conceptual understanding. Modern international law developed out of Renaissance Europe and is strongly entwined with the development of western political organisation at that time. The development of European notions of sovereignty and nation states would necessitate the development of methods for interstate relations and standards of behaviour, and these would lay the foundations of what would become international law. However, while the origins of the modern system of international law can be traced back 400 years, the development of the concepts and practises that would underpin that system can be traced back to ancient historical politics and relationships thousands of years old. Important concepts are derived from the practice between Greek city-states and the Roman law concept of ius gentium (which regulated contacts between Roman citizens and non-Roman people). These principles were not universal however. In East Asia, political theory was based not on the equality of states, but rather the cosmological supremacy of the Emperor of China.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
International law 4rd part
 
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Main articles: Public international law has a special status as law because there is no international police force, and courts (e.g. the International Court of Justice as the primary UN judicial organ) lack the capacity to penalise disobedience. next 5th part
Brexit and International Law
 
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A brief discussion of where Brexit has been, seems to be, and is headed, mostly in regards to rights to EU citizenship and issues involving Article 62 of the Vienna Convention. Sources include the following: ON IRELAND, NORTHERN IRISH EU CITIZENSHIP AND THE IRISH BORDER: -The Irish Times. "UK immigration rules ‘deny’ NI-born Irish citizens access to EU rights". https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/uk-immigration-rules-deny-ni-born-irish-citizens-access-to-eu-rights-1.3846117. April 1, 2019. -The Atlantic. "The Good Friday Agreement in the Age of Brexit". https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2018/04/good-friday-agreement-20th-anniversary/557393/. April 10, 2018. -Business Insider. "Theresa May's Brexit Settled Status Scheme Could Break Good Friday Agreement". https://www.businessinsider.com/theresa-mays-brexit-settled-status-scheme-could-break-good-friday-agreement-2019-4. 2019. ON ARTICLE 62 OF THE VIENNA CONVENTION ON TREATIES: -The Standard. "Attorney General Geoffrey Cox Warned Using Vienna Convention to Get out of Backstop is a Complete Non-Starter". https://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/brexit-latest-attorney-general-geoffrey-cox-warned-using-vienna-convention-to-get-out-of-backstop-is-a4091711.html. March 14, 2019. -The Conversation. "Brexit: Why unilateral withdrawal from any future treaty would ruin the UK’s reputation". http://theconversation.com/brexit-why-unilateral-withdrawal-from-any-future-treaty-would-ruin-the-uks-reputation-113591. March 15, 2019. -United Nations. "Vienna Convention on the law of treaties (with annex)". https://treaties.un.org/doc/publication/unts/volume%201155/volume-1155-i-18232-english.pdf. May 23, 1969. ON GENERAL BREXIT INFORMATION, MEP REPS AND OTHER TRADE ISSUES: -European Parliament. "Article 50 TEU: Withdrawal of a Member State from the EU". http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2016/577971/EPRS_BRI(2016)577971_EN.pdf. February 2016. -Bloomberg. "Moldova Grudge Could Cost U.K. Access to $1.7 Trillion Projects". https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-17/how-tiny-moldova-s-brexit-grudge-could-cost-u-k-1-7-trillion. October 17, 2018. -Reuters. "Taiwan objects to Britain's post-Brexit WTO services trade arrangement". https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu-wto-taiwan/taiwan-objects-to-britains-post-brexit-wto-services-trade-arrangement-idUKKCN1PA2TP. January 16, 2019. -Politico. "MEPs consider nightmare scenario of Brexit delay". https://www.politico.eu/article/meps-consider-nightmare-scenario-of-brexit-delay/. January 12, 2019.
Views: 49 landfarer
How to Use the Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law
 
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A comprehensive online resource containing over 1600 peer-reviewed articles on every aspect of public international law, making it the definitive reference work in the discipline. http://opil.ouplaw.com/home/EPIL Written and edited by an incomparable team of over 800 scholars and practitioners, published in partnership with the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and updated throughout the year, this major reference work is essential for anyone researching or teaching international law. Discover more at http://opil.ouplaw.com/home/EPIL (c) Oxford University Press
James Crawford on the ILC Articles on State Responsibility
 
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To watch the full lecture, please go to http://legal.un.org/avl/faculty/Crawford.html Mr. James Crawford, Professor of International Law, Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge
Public international law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Public international law 00:00:58 1 History 00:04:20 2 International relations 00:08:00 2.1 Treaties 00:10:23 2.2 Statehood and responsibility 00:15:52 2.3 Territory and the sea 00:17:16 2.4 International organisations 00:17:43 3 Social and economic policy 00:18:21 3.1 Human rights 00:18:53 3.2 Labour law 00:19:38 3.3 Development and finance 00:19:53 3.4 Environmental law 00:20:04 3.5 Trade 00:20:15 4 Conflict and force 00:20:24 4.1 War and armed conflict 00:20:45 4.2 Humanitarian law 00:21:33 4.3 International criminal law 00:21:50 5 Courts and enforcement 00:23:57 5.1 Domestic enforcement 00:25:28 5.2 International bodies 00:30:46 5.3 International courts 00:31:20 5.4 East Africa Community 00:31:44 5.5 Union of South American Nations 00:32:09 5.6 Andean Community of Nations 00:32:42 6 International legal theory 00:36:11 6.1 Terminology 00:38:09 7 Criticisms 00:41:05 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= International law is the set of rules generally regarded and accepted in relations between nations. It serves as a framework for the practice of stable and organized international relations. International law differs from state-based legal systems in that it is primarily applicable to countries rather than to individual citizens. National law may become international law when treaties permit national jurisdiction to supranational tribunals such as the European Court of Human Rights or the International Criminal Court. Treaties such as the Geneva Conventions may require national law to conform to respective parts. International law is consent-based governance. This means that a state member may choose to not abide by international law, and even to break its treaty. This is an issue of state sovereignty. International laws are consent-based. Violations of customary international law and peremptory norms (jus cogens) can lead to wars.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Globalization of International Law?
 
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Speaker: Prof. James R. Crawford, University of Cambridge Greetings: Prof. Ron Harris Inaugural Event of the International Law Workshop, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University 19.5.14
Views: 988 TAUVOD
Customary international law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Customary international law 00:00:47 1 Recognition of customary international law 00:01:41 1.1 iJus cogens/i 00:02:47 2 Codification of international customary law 00:03:36 2.1 Silence as consent 00:05:32 3 The International Court of Justice 00:07:50 4 Bilateral versus multilateral customary international law 00:08:42 5 Other customary international laws 00:09:24 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Customary international law is an aspect of international law involving the principle of custom. Along with general principles of law and treaties, custom is considered by the International Court of Justice, jurists, the United Nations, and its member states to be among the primary sources of international law. Many governments accept in principle the existence of customary international law, although there are differing opinions as to what rules are contained in it. In 1950, the International Law Commission listed the following sources as forms of evidence to customary international law: treaties, decisions of national and international courts, national legislation, opinions of national legal advisors, diplomatic correspondence, and practice of international organizations.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts
Human Rights in 2066 | William Schabas | TEDxZurich
 
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Human rights may be based upon values that have ancient origins…. but this does not mean they are static and never changing. If we can track progress in the past, can we also imagine it in the future? Shabas challenges us to think about what our human rights will look like in half a century. Professor William A. Schabas is professor of international law at Middlesex University in London. He is also professor of international human law and human rights at Leiden University, emeritus professor of human rights law at the National University of Ireland Galway and honorary chairman of the Irish Centre for Human Rights. Professor Schabas holds BA and MA degrees in history from the University of Toronto and LLB, LLM and LLD degrees from the University of Montreal, as well as several honorary doctorates. He is the author of more than twenty books dealing in whole or in part with international human rights law and international criminal law, including the European Convention on Human Rights (Oxford 2015), The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: The travaux préparatoires (Cambridge 2013), Unimaginable Atrocities (Oxford, 2012), The International Criminal Court: A Commentary on the Rome Statute (Oxford, 2010), Introduction to the International Criminal Court (Cambridge, 2011). This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 23635 TEDx Talks
Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties
 
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The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties is a treaty concerning the international law on treaties between states. It was adopted on 22 May 1969 and opened for signature on 23 May 1969. The Convention entered into force on 27 January 1980. The VCLT has been ratified by 114 states as of April 2014. Some countries that have not ratified the Convention, such as the United States, recognize parts of it as a restatement of customary law and binding upon them as such. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 26362 Audiopedia
Ryan Goodman: Socializing States: Promoting Human Rights through International Law
 
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This lecture was hosted by the Murphy Institute's Center for Ethics and Public Affairs at Tulane University on November 15, 2014. Ryan Goodman is the Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law, as well a Professor of Politics and Professor of Sociology at NYU. Prior to joining NYU, Professor Goodman was the inaugural Rita E. Hauser Professor of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at Harvard Law School. The author of dozens of articles on public international law, international human rights law, and international relations, Professor Goodman has also published six books and edited volumes, including Socializing States: Promoting Human Rights through International Law, with Derek Jinks (Oxford University Press, 2013); International Human Rights, with Philip Alston (Oxford University Press, 2012); and Interrogations, Forced Feedings, and the Role of Health Professionals, with Mindy Jane Roseman (Harvard University Press, 2009). He also is co-editor-in-chief of the national security blog, JustSecurity.org.
Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_World_Approaches_to_International_Law 00:00:36 1 History 00:00:44 1.1 Early origins (Generation I) 00:01:25 1.2 New age movement (Generation II) 00:02:41 2 Objectives 00:03:28 3 Concepts 00:03:37 3.1 Third World 00:04:32 3.2 Approaches 00:05:25 3.3 International Law 00:07:23 4 Scholars 00:07:56 4.1 First Generationsup[50]/sup 00:08:16 4.2 Second Generation 00:08:50 5 Criticism 00:10:11 6 See also 00:10:38 7 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) is a critical school of international legal scholarship and an intellectual and political movement. It is a "broad dialectic opposition to international law", which perceives international law as facilitating the continuing exploitation of the Third World through subordination to the West. TWAIL scholars (known as TWAIL-ers) seek to change what they identify as international law's oppressive aspects, through the re-examination of the colonial foundations of international law.
Views: 57 wikipedia tts
International Law
 
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Leila Sadat is one of the country's leading experts in international and comparative law. She is the author of more than three dozen articles and several books on international criminal law and justice, terrorism, crimes against humanity, French law and European Union Law.
2013 James Crawford Lecture on International Law
 
01:25:33
"From Humanitarian Intervention to the Responsibility to Protect" Presented by Professor Anne Orford UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in 2011 declared that human protection had become the 'defining purpose of the United Nations in the 21st Century'. Professor Anne Orford, holder of the Michael D Kirby Chair of International Law at Melbourne Law School, will explore the implications of the shift from the language of humanitarian intervention to the responsibility to protect. Dr Emily Crawford will provide a commentary.
Condominium (international law) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Condominium (international law) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In international law, a condominium (plural either condominia, as in Latin, or condominiums) is a political territory (state or border area) in or over which multiple sovereign powers formally agree to share equal dominium (in the sense of sovereignty) and exercise their rights jointly, without dividing it into "national" zones. Although a condominium has always been recognized as a theoretical possibility, condominia have been rare in practice. A major problem, and the reason so few have existed, is the difficulty of ensuring co-operation between the sovereign powers; once the understanding fails, the status is likely to become untenable. The word is recorded in English since c. 1714, from Modern Latin, apparently coined in Germany c. 1700 from Latin com- "together" + dominium "right of ownership" (compare domain). A condominium of three sovereign powers is sometimes called a tripartite condominium or tridominium.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Training on International Water Law and Instruments including UN articles on Groundwater
 
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The training on International Water Law and Instruments including UN articles on Groundwater was held for participants of the Orange-Senqu River Basin Commission (ORASECOM) on 1 - 3 December 2017 in Johannesburg, South Africa. The training was organised by WaterNet on behalf of the SADC Water Division. Funding for the course was provided by the German and British Governments through the delegated authority of GIZ. A total of 24 participants attended the course.
Dr Catherine O'Rourke
 
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EJIL: Live! Episode 18 In this episode of EJIL: Live! the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Professor Joseph Weiler, speaks with Catherine O’Rourke, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights and International Law at the Transitional Justice Institute and School of Law at Ulster University. Her article “Feminist Strategy in International Law: Understanding Its Legal, Normative and Political Dimensions” appears in issue 4 of volume 28 of the Journal. Rather than taking a specific problem and refracting it through gender and feminist concerns, this article constitutes a reflection on the field itself. The conversation deepens that reflection, whilst offering fascinating insights on how and why the article came into being, how the study underlying the article was conducted and what kind of general lessons may be gleaned from it. The conversation concludes with some thoughts on how scholars may weave a feminist sensibility into a general international law course. The interview was recorded at the European University Institute. EJIL: Live! is the official podcast of the European Journal of International Law (EJIL), one of the world's leading international law journals. Regular episodes of EJIL: Live! are released in both video and audio formats to coincide with the publication of each quarterly issue of the Journal, and include interviews with the authors of articles appearing in that issue as well as a wide variety of news and reviews when possible. Additional video episodes, EJIL: Live! Extras, are also produced from time to time. Episodes of EJIL: Live! can be accessed, in both audio and video formats, via the EJIL website (www.ejil.org) and EJIL:Talk! (www.ejiltalk.org). Video-format episodes can also be found on the EJIL: Live! channel on YouTube. Comments and reactions to EJIL: Live! episodes are welcome, and may be submitted to our blog, EJIL: Talk! For more information, we invite you to check our website: www.ejil.org.
Views: 474 EJIL Live
ESIL 2016 | The Relevance of International Law in Crisis Situations | 08.09.2016
 
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Pauls Raudseps (Weekly ""IR"") talks The Relevance of International Law in Crisis Situations with H.E. Mr. Edgars Rinkevics, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Latvia.
Views: 92 rgsledu
'Obama has violated international law for 2 years already'
 
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news around the world,recent world news,news of world,economic news articles,interesting news articles,technology news articles,spanish news articles,political news articles,government news articles,world news articles,egypt latest news,egypt news today,
Views: 0 hehen zexis
International law and Israeli settlements | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_law_and_Israeli_settlements 00:02:16 1 Background 00:06:40 2 Status of the territories 00:10:33 3 International legal opinions 00:11:04 3.1 United Nations 00:14:01 3.2 International Court of Justice 00:14:51 3.3 International Committee of the Red Cross 00:15:20 3.4 Countries 00:15:28 3.4.1 United States 00:19:03 3.4.2 Israel 00:24:25 3.4.3 Canada 00:24:52 3.4.4 United Kingdom 00:25:17 3.5 Other views 00:28:23 4 Legal arguments 00:29:15 4.1 Fourth Geneva Convention 00:29:44 4.1.1 Article 2 00:30:12 4.1.1.1 Endorsement 00:34:02 4.1.1.2 Rejection 00:36:02 4.1.2 Article 49 00:37:05 4.1.2.1 Endorsement 00:38:53 4.1.2.2 Rejection 00:40:08 4.1.3 Application 00:41:50 4.2 Arguments based on UNSC Resolution 242 and the British Mandate 00:48:45 4.3 Arguments based on the cause of the war 00:50:28 4.4 Arguments based on property rights and private ownership 00:50:57 5 Unauthorized or illegal outposts 00:57:12 6 See also 00:57:33 7 Notes 00:57:42 7.1 Citations 00:57:51 8 Sources Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The international community considers the establishment of Israeli settlements in the Israeli-occupied territories illegal under international law, because of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 which states: "The Occupying Power shall not deport or transfer parts of its own civilian population into the territory it occupies." Israel maintains that it is not in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention since, in its view, Israeli citizens were neither deported nor transferred to the territories, and they cannot be considered to have become "occupied territory" since there had been no internationally recognized legal sovereign prior. The United Nations Security Council, the United Nations General Assembly, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the International Court of Justice and the High Contracting Parties to the Convention have all affirmed that the Fourth Geneva Convention does apply.Numerous UN resolutions and prevailing international opinion hold that Israeli settlements in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights are a violation of international law, including UN Security Council resolutions in 1979, 1980, and 2016. UN Security Council Resolution 446 refers to the Fourth Geneva Convention as the applicable international legal instrument, and calls upon Israel to desist from transferring its own population into the territories or changing their demographic makeup. 126 Representatives at the reconvened Conference of the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva Conventions in 2014 declared the settlements illegal as has the primary judicial organ of the UN, the International Court of Justice and the International Committee of the Red Cross. The position of successive Israeli governments is that all authorized settlements are entirely legal and consistent with international law. In practice, Israel does not accept that the Fourth Geneva Convention applies de jure, but has stated that on humanitarian issues it will govern these areas de facto by its provisions, without specifying which these are. The majority of legal scholars hold the settlements to violate international law, while others have offered dissenting views supporting the Israeli position. The Israeli Supreme Court itself has never addressed the issue of the settlements' legality.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Enforcement of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in International Law
 
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Subject:Human Rights and Duties Paper: Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; Group/ Collective Rights
Views: 212 Vidya-mitra
Condominium (international law) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Condominium (international law) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In international law, a condominium (plural either condominia, as in Latin, or condominiums) is a political territory (state or border area) in or over which multiple sovereign powers formally agree to share equal dominium (in the sense of sovereignty) and exercise their rights jointly, without dividing it into "national" zones. Although a condominium has always been recognized as a theoretical possibility, condominia have been rare in practice. A major problem, and the reason so few have existed, is the difficulty of ensuring co-operation between the sovereign powers; once the understanding fails, the status is likely to become untenable. The word is recorded in English since c. 1714, from Modern Latin, apparently coined in Germany c. 1700 from Latin com- "together" + dominium "right of ownership" (compare domain). A condominium of three sovereign powers is sometimes called a tripartite condominium or tridominium.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
What is INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE? What does INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ We're uploading our new videos at - https://bittubers.com/profile/TheAudiopedia . Check us out and SUBSCRIBE there. ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE? What does INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE mean? INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE meaning - INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE definition - INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The International Court of Justice is the primary judicial branch of the United Nations (UN). Seated in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, the court settles legal disputes submitted to it by states and provides advisory opinions on legal questions submitted to it by duly authorized international branches, agencies, and the UN General Assembly. Established in 1945 by the UN Charter, the Court began work in 1946 as the successor to the Permanent Court of International Justice. The Statute of the International Court of Justice, similar to that of its predecessor, is the main constitutional document constituting and regulating the Court. The Court's workload covers a wide range of judicial activity. After the court ruled that the United States's covert war against Nicaragua was in violation of international law (Nicaragua v. United States), the United States withdrew from compulsory jurisdiction in 1986 to accept the court's jurisdiction only on a case-by-case basis. Chapter XIV of the United Nations Charter authorizes the UN Security Council to enforce Court rulings. However, such enforcement is subject to the veto power of the five permanent members of the Council, which the United States used in the Nicaragua case. The ICJ is composed of fifteen judges elected to nine-year terms by the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council from a list of people nominated by the national groups in the Permanent Court of Arbitration. The election process is set out in Articles 4–19 of the ICJ statute. Elections are staggered, with five judges elected every three years to ensure continuity within the court. Should a judge die in office, the practice has generally been to elect a judge in a special election to complete the term. No two judges may be nationals of the same country. According to Article 9, the membership of the Court is supposed to represent the "main forms of civilization and of the principal legal systems of the world". Essentially, that has meant common law, civil law and socialist law (now post-communist law). There is an informal understanding that the seats will be distributed by geographic regions so that there are five seats for Western countries, three for African states (including one judge of francophone civil law, one of Anglophone common law and one Arab), two for Eastern European states, three for Asian states and two for Latin American and Caribbean states. The five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (France, Russia, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States) always have a judge on the Court, thereby occupying three of the Western seats, one of the Asian seats and one of the Eastern European seats. The exception was China, which did not have a judge on the Court from 1967 to 1985 because it did not put forward a candidate. Article 6 of the Statute provides that all judges should be "elected regardless of their nationality among persons of high moral character" who are either qualified for the highest judicial office in their home states or known as lawyers with sufficient competence in international law. Judicial independence is dealt with specifically in Articles 16–18. Judges of the ICJ are not able to hold any other post or act as counsel. In practice, Members of the Court have their own interpretation of these rules and allow them to be involved in outside arbitration and hold professional posts as long as there is no conflict of interest. A judge can be dismissed only by a unanimous vote of the other members of the Court. Despite these provisions, the independence of ICJ judges has been questioned. For example, during the Nicaragua case, the United States issued a communiqué suggesting that it could not present sensitive material to the Court because of the presence of judges from Eastern bloc states.
Views: 15282 The Audiopedia
Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Planck_Institute_for_Comparative_Public_Law_and_International_Law 00:04:06 Directors 00:04:54 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9060380504681574 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law (Max Planck Institute for International Law, MPIL) is a legal research institute located in Heidelberg, Germany. It is operated by the Max Planck Society. The institute was founded in 1924 and was originally named the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Foreign and International Public Law and located in Berlin. It later relocated to Heidelberg and received its current name in 1949. The institute currently employs 69 scientific staff and is led by two co-directors, Armin von Bogdandy (since 2002) and Anne Peters (since 2013). It is seated at Heidelberg University's New Campus. The institute is one of the most important research institutions in the German-speaking world in the fields of international law, European law, comparative public law, and for the theoretical frameworks of transnational law. It has traditionally performed important advisory functions for parliaments, administrative organs and courts concerned with questions of public international law, comparative public law and European law. In particular, the institute has provided the German Federal Constitutional Court, the German Bundestag and the German Federal Government with information, expert testimony and counsel, representing the Federal Republic of Germany in several high-profile cases.The institute's directors regularly hold the chairs for international law at the University of Heidelberg Law School. Moreover, the institute's directors traditionally have held outstanding positions in national and international courts and bodies: Hermann Mosler, Justice in the European Court of Human Rights (1959–1976); Justice in the International Court of Justice (1976–1985) Rudolf Bernhardt, President of the European Court of Human Rights (Justice 1981-1998, President 1992-1998) Helmut Steinberger, Justice in the German Federal Constitutional Court (1975–1987), Vice President of the OSCE Court of Conciliation and Arbitration (2001–2008) Jochen Frowein, Vice President of the European Commission for Human Rights (1977–1993) Rüdiger Wolfrum, President of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (Justice since 1996, President 2005-2008) Armin von Bogdandy, President of the European Nuclear Energy Tribunal (Justice since 2001, President since 2006) Anne Peters, Member (substitute) of the European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission) in respect of Germany (since 2011)Former research assistants include Hans-Peter Kaul, sitting vice president of the International Criminal Court, Juliane Kokott, sitting Advocate General of the European Court of Justice, former Justice in the International Court of Justice Carl-August Fleischhauer, and Georg Nolte, present member of the United Nations International Law Commission.With 630.000 volumes, the institute's library contains the largest collection for international law, European law, and public law in Europe. Regular publications by the institute include the "Heidelberg Journal for International Law", the "Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law"; the "Journal of the History of International Law"; the "Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law"; and the semi-annual bibliography "Public International Law". Guests are involved in the institute’s programs, especially symposia, lectures and the weekly meetings of the research staff, as well as various staff-led working groups on specific subject areas.
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National Conference-cum-Workshop on Thematic areas in consumer law : Emerging Trends
 
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Team DNLU is delighted to introducing you to our organizing secretary Ms. Swati Singh Parmar. Ms. Swati Singh Parmar as a highly-motivated and hard work orientated law scholar, she has a proven track record of sound academics. She has been awarded ‘Gold Medal’ and ‘Excellence in knowledge creation -Award’ by Amity University, Uttar Pradesh for the performance during the LL.M. course. Her areas of interest include Public International law, International Human Rights, International Organisations, and Jurisprudence. She has published four book chapters and ten research articles in international research journals on issues relating to international law. She also has presented research articles at 21 national and nine international academic conferences. She is the member of the Advisory Board, Internationalism, a peer reviewed international journal in international law. She has been the member of editorial board of five reputed research journals. We at DNLU endeavour to give the best platform possible, for an experience that's worth all the hard work and excitement. While every hour is pivotal in the preparation leading up to this National conference, the next 7days give you one last chance to be a part of a conference that promises to make a difference. Important dates:- Last date for Abstract Submission- 2nd March 2019, Intimation of Acceptance of Abstract- 3rd March2019, Last date for sending Registration form and fees- 4th March 2019, Last date for Submission of Full papers- 8th March 2019. Address your queries at :- email - [email protected] Ph. No. - 07905726732 Website - mpdnlu.ac.in #DNLU #livelaw #scconline #lawctopus #NLU #law #conference #national #workshop #consumer #rights #protection #madhyapradesh #lawsociety #lawconference #futurelawyers #innovation #careers #india
Targeted Killing in International Law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Targeted_Killing_in_International_Law 00:01:31 1 Background 00:03:24 2 Content summary 00:06:29 3 Reception 00:10:12 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Targeted Killing in International Law is a book about the legality of targeted killing, written by Nils Melzer. It was first published by Oxford University Press in May 2008. The book explores the history of targeted killing as a government strategy by multiple countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Israel, Switzerland and Germany; for both military and law enforcement purposes. Melzer argues that directly after the September 11 attacks in the United States, perceptions of the tactic became more positive. Melzer holds a PhD degree in law from University of Zürich. His dissertation dealt with targeted killing and the book updates and revises that work. He had earlier written on the subject for Yearbook of Humanitarian International Law in 2006. Melzer serves as a legal advisor for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). He has lectured at the Master-level at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights. The book received a favorable reception and was a joint winner of the 2009 Paul Guggenheim Prize in International Law given by the Geneva Graduate Institute. It garnered positive reviews in publications including the International Criminal Justice Review, the European Journal of International Law, the Leiden Journal of International Law, the Australian Year Book of International Law, the American Journal of International Law, and in the book Legislating the War on Terror: An Agenda for Reform.
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Thomas Franck Lecture: International Law as a Belief System
 
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This lecture introduces Jean d'Aspremont's new book entitled 'International Law as a Belief System' (Cambridge University Press, 2017). The book makes the claim that international law bears the attributes of a belief system, for the fundamental doctrines (e.g. sources, responsibility, statehood, personality, interpretation jus cogens, etc) around which international legal discourses are articulated invent their origin and dictate their own functioning. According to this expository framework, fundamental doctrines’ invention of their origin and regulation of their functioning are made possible by their representation as rules derived from some key international instruments (e.g. the Statute of the International Court of Justice, the Montevideo Convention on Rights and Duties of States, the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, and the Articles on State Responsibility, the Reparations Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice, etc), thereby allowing the formation and the functioning of fundamental doctrines to be explained by fundamental doctrines themselves.
Views: 912 Jean d'Aspremont
Nigerian Judge Chile Eboe Osuji, Becomes President Of International Criminal Court
 
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The Judges Of The International Criminal Court, Sitting In A Plenary Session Has Elected Nigerian Judge Chile Eboe-Osuji As President Of The Court For A Three-Year Term With Immediate Effect. The Election Took Place On Sunday, March 11, 2018, According To The Information Made Available On The Icc Website. In This Report, Correspondet Gimalo-Angel Olowogoke Profiles The Auther Of Two Books And Numerous Law Journal Articles In International Law. Chile Eboe-Osuji is a judge of the International Criminal Court, The Hague. He was first elected on 16 December 2011 and sworn in on 9 March 2012. In March 2018, He was elected the president of the International Criminal He was the Legal Advisor to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Judge Eboe-Osuji was born in Añara, Isiala Mbano, Imo state, south-east Nigeria, on September 2 1962. He obtained his bachelor of laws degree from the University of Calabar, south-south Nigeria, master of laws degree from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and doctor of laws degree from the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Eboe-Osuji was called to the Nigerian Bar in 1986 and practised briefly there. After obtaining his master of laws degree from McGill in 1991, he worked as a barrister in Canada, having been called to the Bar in Ontario and in British Columbia in 1993. From 1997 to 2005, Eboe-Osuji worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda as prosecution counsel and senior legal officer to the judges of the tribunal. From 2005 to 2007, he worked in Canada as a barrister and law lecturer. he became the Legal Advisor to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay in 2010, and held a cross-appointment as the principal prosecution appeals counsel at the Special Court for Sierra Leone, in the case of Charles Taylor, the former President of Liberia. He has authored two books and numerous law journal articles in international law. On 16 December 2011, Eboe-Osuji was elected as a judge of the International Criminal Court. He won the office in the fifteenth ballot in the Assembly of States Parties.He took office on 11 March 2012. From September 2013, Eboe-Osuji – alongside Judges Olga Venecia Herrera Carbuccia and Robert Fremr – presided over the trial against Deputy President William Ruto of Kenya, who was accused of stoking a wave of killing for political gain after the country’s contested 2007 elections. The Presidency – consisting of the President and the two Vice-Presidents – plays a key role in providing strategic leadership to the ICC as a whole. The Presidency coordinates with the other organs and seeks the concurrence of the Prosecutor on matters of mutual concern. Congratulation to justice chile eboe-osuji.
Views: 1287 Gimalo Angel