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The over the counter (OTC) market
 
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Learn about Australia's large and diverse OTC bond market with Elizabeth Moran, Director of Fixed Income Education and Research at FIIG Securities.
Views: 7023 FIIG Securities
Word of the Day: Over-the-Counter (OTC)
 
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Over-the-counter trades of financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, commodities or derivatives are trades that are negotiated bilaterally, in other words, between two parties. This is contrasted with exchange trading, which occurs via facilities constructed for the purpose of trading (i.e. exchanges), such as futures exchanges or stock exchanges like the NYSE for example. The OTC derivatives market, according to the Bank of International Settlements latest semi-annual OTC derivatives reported, has reached $707,568,901,000,000. That is nearly an 18% increase from 6 months ago, and for an industry that has already been called too interconnected and too big to fail, it is alarming. Check out the full Capital Account with Lauren Lyster at http://www.youtube.com/capitalaccount Follow Lauren on Twitter: http://twitter.com/LaurenLyster
Views: 8723 RT America
Over-the-counter, over the top
 
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Credit default swaps have worsened market anxiety because they are conducted in the over-the-counter market, where regulations are few and information about risk is often hidden. Marketplace Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains.
Views: 49897 Marketplace APM
OTC Market for Bonds in Kenya
 
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ABN's Mashudu Masutha speaks with Paul Muthaura, CEO of the Capital Markets Authority, to discuss the OTC market for bonds in Kenya.
Views: 112 CNBCAfrica
Unsupervised Over the counter markets - Part 1
 
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(www.abndigital.com) On today's programme, we look into the emergence of over-the-counter markets in Nigeria. These markets enable the trade of securities such as stocks, bonds and derivatives without the supervision of a recognized securities exchange.
Views: 511 CNBCAfrica
Stock and Bond Market Correlation: How to Handle Inflation in Investment Analysis (1997)
 
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Much effort has gone into the study of financial markets and how prices vary with time. Charles Dow, one of the founders of Dow Jones & Company and The Wall Street Journal, enunciated a set of ideas on the subject which are now called Dow Theory. Modigiliani's books: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=a3df9c167e859249c471fa08d652e1d7&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=franco%20modigliani This is the basis of the so-called technical analysis method of attempting to predict future changes. One of the tenets of "technical analysis" is that market trends give an indication of the future, at least in the short term. The claims of the technical analysts are disputed by many academics, who claim that the evidence points rather to the random walk hypothesis, which states that the next change is not correlated to the last change. The role of human psychology in price variations also plays a significant factor. Large amounts of volatility often indicate the presence of strong emotional factors playing into the price. Fear can cause excessive drops in price and greed can create bubbles. In recent years the rise of algorithmic and high-frequency program trading has seen the adoption of momentum, ultra-short term moving average and other similar strategies which are based on technical as opposed to fundamental or theoretical concepts of market Behaviour. The scale of changes in price over some unit of time is called the volatility. It was discovered by Benoît Mandelbrot that changes in prices do not follow a Gaussian distribution, but are rather modeled better by Lévy stable distributions. The scale of change, or volatility, depends on the length of the time unit to a power a bit more than 1/2. Large changes up or down are more likely than what one would calculate using a Gaussian distribution with an estimated standard deviation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_market The bond market (also debt market or credit market) is a financial market where participants can issue new debt, known as the primary market, or buy and sell debt securities, known as the secondary market. This is usually in the form of bonds, but it may include notes, bills, and so on. The primary goal of the bond market is to provide a mechanism for long term funding of public and private expenditures. Traditionally, the bond market was largely dominated by the United States, but today the US is about 44% of the market.[1] As of 2009, the size of the worldwide bond market (total debt outstanding) is an estimated $82.2 trillion,[2] of which the size of the outstanding U.S. bond market debt was $31.2 trillion according to Bank for International Settlements (BIS), or alternatively $35.2 trillion as of Q2 2011 according to Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA).[2] Nearly all of the $822 billion average daily trading volume in the U.S. bond market[3] takes place between broker-dealers and large institutions in a decentralized, over-the-counter (OTC) market. However, a small number of bonds, primarily corporate, are listed on exchanges. References to the "bond market" usually refer to the government bond market, because of its size, liquidity, relative lack of credit risk and, therefore, sensitivity to interest rates. Because of the inverse relationship between bond valuation and interest rates, the bond market is often used to indicate changes in interest rates or the shape of the yield curve. The yield curve is the measure of "cost of funding". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bond_market
Views: 5118 The Film Archives
What is SECONDARY MARKET? What does SECONDARY MARKET mean? SECONDARY MARKET meaning & explanation
 
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What is SECONDARY MARKET? What does SECONDARY MARKET mean? SECONDARY MARKET meaning - SECONDARY MARKET definition - SECONDARY MARKET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The secondary market, also called the aftermarket, is the financial market in which previously issued financial instruments such as stock, bonds, options, and futures are bought and sold. Another frequent usage of "secondary market" is to refer to loans which are sold by a mortgage bank to investors such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The term "secondary market" is also used to refer to the market for any used goods or assets, or an alternative use for an existing product or asset where the customer base is the second market (for example, corn has been traditionally used primarily for food production and feedstock, but a "second" or "third" market has developed for use in ethanol production). With primary issuances of securities or financial instruments, or the primary market, investors purchase these securities directly from issuers such as corporations issuing shares in an IPO or private placement, or directly from the federal government in the case of treasuries. After the initial issuance, investors can purchase from other investors in the secondary market. The secondary market for a variety of assets can vary from loans to stocks, from fragmented to centralized, and from illiquid to very liquid. The major stock exchanges are the most visible example of liquid secondary markets - in this case, for stocks of publicly traded companies. Exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange, London Stock Exchange and Nasdaq provide a centralized, liquid secondary market for the investors who own stocks that trade on those exchanges. Most bonds and structured products trade “over the counter,” or by phoning the bond desk of one’s broker-dealer. Loans sometimes trade online using a Loan Exchange. In the secondary market, securities are sold by and transferred from one investor or speculator to another. It is therefore important that the secondary market be highly liquid (originally, the only way to create this liquidity was for investors and speculators to meet at a fixed place regularly; this is how stock exchanges originated, see History of the Stock Exchange). As a general rule, the greater the number of investors that participate in a given marketplace, and the greater the centralization of that marketplace, the more liquid the market. Fundamentally, secondary markets mesh the investor's preference for liquidity (i.e., the investor's desire not to tie up his or her money for a long period of time, in case the investor needs it to deal with unforeseen circumstances) with the capital user's preference to be able to use the capital for an extended period of time. Accurate share price allocates scarce capital more efficiently when new projects are financed through a new primary market offering, but accuracy may also matter in the secondary market because: 1) price accuracy can reduce the agency costs of management, and make hostile takeover a less risky proposition and thus move capital into the hands of better managers, and 2) accurate share price aids the efficient allocation of debt finance whether debt offerings or institutional borrowing. The term may refer to markets in things of value other than securities. For example, the ability to buy and sell intellectual property such as patents, or rights to musical compositions, is considered a secondary market because it allows the owner to freely resell property entitlements issued by the government.
Views: 3375 The Audiopedia
Why ETFs Are Quickly Becoming a Must-Have Tool for Investors (Explainer Video)
 
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Learn how ETFs deliver markets on demand and are becoming a must-have tool for investors in this animated explainer video from BlackRock's iShares (http://iShares.com). Animated explainer video produced by Wienot Films (http://wienotfilms.com). _________________ BlackRock - iShares - Markets on Demand Animated Explainer Video Investors face an entirely new set of challenges in today’s global markets. Lower return expectations, increased uncertainty, and game-changing regulations are making building portfolios more difficult than ever. At the same time, some markets are becoming less liquid and harder to trade in, putting some opportunities just out of reach. Overcoming these challenges requires a rethinking of how we gain access to investment exposures. Exchange traded funds, also known as ETFs, are a financial technology democratizing access to the global financial markets. ETFs bundle hundreds of securities into standardized and transparent packages that provide exposure to distinct segments of the market. Those packages are then listed and traded on an equity exchange and made available to investors of all types. In this way, ETFs transform asset classes into markets on demand, providing diversified access to broad and narrow exposures in a single trade. They are quickly becoming a must-have tool to pursue opportunities no matter the asset class—whether that’s US equities, investment grade bonds, global equities, high yield bonds, or even emerging market debt. With ETFs, investment ideas can be turned into investment actions. And nowhere is the value of an ETF more apparent than in asset classes that can be inefficient, expensive and opaque, like fixed income. For example, to gain diversified high yield bond exposure, an investor may have to purchase hundreds of illiquid bonds in the over-the-counter market, negotiating with a dealer on the price for each bond in what can be a lengthy and complex trading process. Instead, investors can now buy a single, liquid ETF on a stock exchange to cost effectively gain exposure to high-yield--or just about any other asset class. Simple, fast, and efficient, ETFs can act as investment building blocks to augment existing portfolios or build highly customized strategies from the ground up. That’s why today, ETFs are a technology investors can use to seamlessly buy, own and sell asset classes from around the world of investments. Simply put, ETFs offer markets on demand. Learn more at iShares dot com. [DISCLOSURE] Visit iShares dot com to view a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses and other information that you should read and consider carefully before investing. Investing involves risk, including possible loss of principal. END
Views: 211 Wienot Films
Back Office Settlement SWIFTS and Reconciliation Video 8
 
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Video contains details on various Back Office function and activities which happen in Trade Life Cycle. Detailed process explained step by Step in Back Office Systems.
Views: 14708 Capital Markets Easy
Over the Counter OTC Markets
 
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Gennecho Finance In this video we will discuss Over the Counter OTC Markets. Personal Finance: Turning Money into Wealth by Arthur J. Keown http://amzn.to/2B3ROcR Sign up to Gennecho's weekly newsletter! http://gennechofinance.gr8.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel Follow us on Twitter @GennechoFinance Like us on Facebook @gennechofinance Follow us on Instagram gennechofinance
Views: 25 Gennecho Learning
Over The Counter Market
 
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An Easy Overview Of "Over The Counter Market"
Views: 1120 Christopher Hunt
Buying Bonds On The Secondary Market
 
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When looking at buying bonds on the secondary market, the most important items to consider are the par value and yield to maturity.
Bond market reforms
 
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The capital markets authority is on course to effect over the counter trading of bonds in reforms that will introduce a hybrid system and deepen the market. Over the counter trading involves negotiated transactions between a buyer and seller without having to go through the automated trading system that will remain operational. The move is expected to rope in more people into bond trading as the country seeks to increase the savings ratio.
Views: 524 KTN News Kenya
Stock Market : What Is an Over-The-Counter Stock?
 
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An over-the-counter stock is generally a stock that is traded within a dealer network, or a group. Make sure to understand what the fees and risks are before investing in over-the-counter stock with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on the stock market and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 5343 ehowfinance
Over the Counter Markets
 
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Training on Over the Counter Markets for Actuarial Science ST 5 Finance and Investment by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi.
Views: 1334 Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
ICFS: Bonds - The Secondary Market
 
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How are bonds traded? Find out here! - If you would like to learn more then make sure to register for the TEC on our website! The course starts on 1st November! http://www.financesociety.co.uk
What are derivatives? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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What are derivatives? How can you use them to your advantage? Tim Bennett explains all in this MoneyWeek Investment video. A derivative is the collective term used for a wide variety of financial instruments whose price derives from or depends on the performance of other underlying investments. Related links… - What are options and covered warrants? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3196NpHDyec - What are futures? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwR5b6E0Xo4 - What is a swap? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVq384nqWqg - Why you should avoid structured products https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Umx5ShOz2oU MoneyWeek videos are designed to help you become a better investor, and to give you a better understanding of the markets. They’re aimed at both beginners and more experienced investors. In all our videos we explain things in an easy-to-understand way. Some videos are about important ideas and concepts. Others are about investment stories and themes in the news. The emphasis is on clarity and brevity. We don’t want to waste your time with a 20-minute video that could easily be so much shorter. We’ve already made over 200 financial videos and we add more each week. You can see the full archive here at MoneyWeek videos.
Views: 538270 MoneyWeek
Business Morning: Analysing Stocks,NASD OTC,Bills,Bonds,FX Markets Pt 2
 
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Stock Market : About Different Types of Bonds
 
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A bond is a debt security that is issued by an authorized organization in which the lender is owed a debt. Learn about municipal bonds, school bonds and highway bonds with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on the stock market and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 3206 ehowfinance
Financial Market & its Types | Primary & Secondary Market | Exams
 
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Exam Kabila is providing latest Content in English and hindi. Important Lectures and Notes for Banking, bank, IBPS PO and Clerk, MBA, BBA, Other Finance Exams, Management Papers, SBI, Railways, SSC, LIC AAO, , IAS, UPSC, CDS, Railways, NDA, State PCS, CLAT and all other similar government competitive examinations. A financial market is a broad term describing any marketplace where buyers and sellers participate in the trade of assets such as equities, bonds, currencies and derivatives. e.g., a stock exchange or commodity exchange. # Types of Financial Market #Capital markets # Stock markets, #Bond markets, #OTC #Commodity markets #Money markets, #Derivatives markets, #Futures markets, #Foreign exchange markets, #Spot market #Interbanks market #Credit market #Cash market 1. capital markets: Capital markets are markets for buying and selling equity and debt instruments. Capital markets channel savings and investment between suppliers of capital such as retail investors and institutional investors, and users of capital like businesses, government and individuals. The capital markets may also be divided into primary markets and secondary markets. A. primary markets: Newly formed (issued) securities are bought or sold in primary markets, such as during initial public offerings. The transactions in primary markets exist between issuers and investors B. secondary markets. : Secondary markets allow investors to buy and sell existing securities. secondary market transactions exist among investors. a. Stock Market Stock markets allow investors to buy and sell shares in publicly traded companies. Any subsequent trading of stock securities occurs in the secondary market. b. Over-The-Counter Market An OTC market handles the exchanging of public stocks not listed on the NASDAQ, New York Stock Exchange etc. c. Bond Markets A bond is a security in which an investor loans money for a defined period of time at a pre-established rate of interest. Bond markets, which provide financing through the issuance of bonds, and enable the subsequent trading thereof. Money Market A money market is a portion of the financial market that trades highly liquid and short-term maturities. Derivatives Market The derivatives market is a financial market that trades securities that derive its value from its underlying asset. Forex Market The forex market is a financial market where currencies are traded. This financial market is the most liquid market in the world as cash is the most liquid of assets. Spot/Cash Market A cash market is a marketplace for the immediate settlement of transactions involving commodities and securities. Interbank Market The interbank market is the financial system and trading of currencies among banks and financial institutions Equity Market The market in which shares are issued and traded, either through exchanges or over-the-counter markets. It is Also known as the stock market Commodity Market' A commodity market is a physical or virtual marketplace for buying, selling and trading raw or primary products,
Views: 124622 ExamKabila
How Stock Market Works | Investing Basics | Animated Short Film | 1957
 
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● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2rOHzmy Animated short film (1957) explains how the American stock market works. Story: Mr. Finchley has just gotten a 60 dollar raise and wants to figure out the best way to invest it. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * A stock market or equity market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares); these may include securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. A stock exchange is an exchange or stock market where stock brokers and traders can buy and/or sell stocks (also called shares), bonds, and other securities. Stock exchanges may also provide facilities for issue and redemption of securities and other financial instruments, and capital events including the payment of income and dividends. Securities traded on a stock exchange include stock issued by listed companies, unit trusts, derivatives, pooled investment products and bonds. Stock exchanges often function as "continuous auction" markets, with buyers and sellers consummating transactions at a central location, such as the floor of the exchange. To be able to trade a security on a certain stock exchange, it must be listed there. Usually, there is a central location at least for record keeping, but trade is increasingly less linked to such a physical place, as modern markets use electronic networks, which gives them advantages of increased speed and reduced cost of transactions. Trade on an exchange is restricted to brokers who are members of the exchange. In recent years, various other trading venues, such as electronic communication networks, alternative trading systems and "dark pools" have taken much of the trading activity away from traditional stock exchanges. The initial public offering of stocks and bonds to investors is by definition done in the primary market and subsequent trading is done in the secondary market. A stock exchange is often the most important component of a stock market. Supply and demand in stock markets are driven by various factors that, as in all free markets, affect the price of stocks. There is usually no obligation for stock to be issued via the stock exchange itself, nor must stock be subsequently traded on the exchange. Such trading may be off exchange or over-the-counter. This is the usual way that derivatives and bonds are traded. Increasingly, stock exchanges are part of a global securities market. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), sometimes known as the "Big Board", is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$19.69 trillion as of May 2015. How Stock Market Works | Investing Basics | Animated Short Film | 1957 TBFA_0018
Views: 20030 The Best Film Archives
Business Morning: FX, Stocks, NASD OTC, Bills & Bonds Markets Review Pt 2
 
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Business Incorporated: FMDQ OTC Market Trading Ahead Bonds And Bills Auctions
 
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Business Morning: Stocks,NASD OTC,Bills,Bonds,FX Markets Week Review In Focus Pt 2
 
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For more information log on to http://www.channelstv.com
Views: 122 Channels Television
What is BOND MARKET? What does BOND MARKET mean? BOND MARKET meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is BOND MARKET? What does BOND MARKET mean? BOND MARKET meaning - BOND MARKET definition - BOND MARKET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The bond market (also debt market or credit market) is a financial market where participants can issue new debt, known as the primary market, or buy and sell debt securities, known as the secondary market. This is usually in the form of bonds, but it may include notes, bills, and so on. Its primary goal is to provide long-term funding for public and private expenditures. The bond market has largely been dominated by the United States, which accounts for about 44% of the market. As of 2009, the size of the worldwide bond market (total debt outstanding) is an estimated at $82.2 trillion, of which the size of the outstanding U.S. bond market debt was $31.2 trillion according to Bank for International Settlements (BIS), or alternatively $35.2 trillion as of Q2 2011 according to Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). The bond market is part of the credit market, with bank loans forming the other main component. The global credit market in aggregate is about 3 times the size of the global equity market. Bank loans are not securities under the Securities and Exchange Act, but bonds typically are and are therefore more highly regulated. Bonds are typically not secured by collateral (although they can be), and are sold in relatively small denominations of around $1,000 to $10,000. Unlike bank loans, bonds may be held by retail investors. Bonds are more frequently traded than loans, although not as often as equity. Nearly all of the average daily trading in the U.S. bond market takes place between broker-dealers and large institutions in a decentralized over-the-counter (OTC) market. However, a small number of bonds, primarily corporate ones, are listed on exchanges. Bond trading prices and volumes are reported on FINRA's Trade Reporting and Compliance Engine, or TRACE. An important part of the bond market is the government bond market, because of its size and liquidity. Government bonds are often used to compare other bonds to measure credit risk. Because of the inverse relationship between bond valuation and interest rates (or yields), the bond market is often used to indicate changes in interest rates or the shape of the yield curve, the measure of "cost of funding". The yield on government bonds in low risk countries such as the United States or Germany is thought to indicate a risk-free rate of default. Other bonds denominated in the same currencies (U.S. Dollars or Euros) will typically have higher yields, in large part because other borrowers are more likely than the U.S. or German Central Governments to default, and the losses to investors in the case of default are expected to be higher. The primary way to default is to not pay in full or not pay on time.
Views: 2847 The Audiopedia
Business Morning: Stocks,NASD OTC,Bills,Bonds,FX Markets Week Review In Focus Pt 1
 
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Views: 147 Channels Television
What is CORPORATE BOND? What does CORPORATE BOND mean? CORPORATE BOND meaning & explanation
 
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What is CORPORATE BOND? What does CORPORATE BOND mean? CORPORATE BOND meaning - CORPORATE BOND definition - CORPORATE BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A corporate bond is a bond issued by a corporation in order to raise financing for a variety of reasons such as to ongoing operations, M&A, or to expand business. The term is usually applied to longer-term debt instruments, with maturity of at least one year. Corporate debt instruments with maturity shorter than one year are referred to as commercial paper. The term "corporate bond" is not strictly defined. Sometimes, the term is used to include all bonds except those issued by governments in their own currencies. In this case governments issuing in other currencies (such as the country of Mexico issuing in US dollars) will be included. The term sometimes also encompasses bonds issued by supranational organizations (such as European Bank for Reconstruction and Development). Strictly speaking, however, it only applies to those issued by corporations. The bonds of local authorities (municipal bonds) are not included. Corporate bonds trade in decentralized, dealer-based, over-the-counter markets. In over-the-counter trading dealers act as intermediaries between buyers and sellers. Corporate bonds are sometimes listed on exchanges (these are called "listed" bonds) and ECNs. However, vast majority of trading volume happens over-the-counter. By far the largest market for corporate bonds is in corporate bonds denominated in US Dollars. US Dollar corporate bond market is the oldest, largest, and most developed. As the term corporate bond is not well defined, the size of the market varies according to who is doing the counting, but it is in the $5 to $6 trillion range. The second largest market is in Euro denominated corporate bonds. Other markets tend to be small by comparison and are usually not well developed, with low trading volumes. Many corporations from other countries issue in either US Dollars or Euros. Foreign corporates issuing bonds in the US Dollar market are called Yankees and their bonds are Yankee bonds. Corporate bonds are divided into two main categories High Grade (also called Investment Grade) and High Yield (also called Non-Investment Grade, Speculative Grade, or Junk Bonds) according to their credit rating. Bonds rated AAA, AA, A, and BBB are High Grade, while bonds rated BB and below are High Yield. This is a significant distinction as High Grade and High Yield bonds are traded by different trading desks and held by different investors. For example, many pension funds and insurance companies are prohibited from holding more than a token amount of High Yield bonds (by internal rules or government regulation). The distinction between High Grade and High Yield is also common to most corporate bond markets. The coupon (i.e. interest payment) is usually taxable for the investor. It is tax deductible for the corporation paying it. For US Dollar corporates, the coupon is almost always semi annual, while Euro denominated corporates pay coupon quarterly. The coupon can be zero. In this case the bond, a zero-coupon bond, is sold at a discount (i.e. a $100 face value bond sold initially for $80). The investor benefits by paying $80, but collecting $100 at maturity. The $20 gain (ignoring time value of money) is in lieu of the regular coupon. However, this is rare for corporate bonds. Some corporate bonds have an embedded call option that allows the issuer to redeem the debt before its maturity date. These are called callable bonds. A less common feature is an embedded put option that allows investors to put the bond back to the issuer before its maturity date. These are called putable bonds. Both of these features are common to the High Yield market. High Grade bonds rarely have embedded options. A straight bond that is neither callable nor putable is called a bullet bond.
Views: 1483 The Audiopedia
Portfolio Diversification through Retail Bonds Trading & Fixed Income Market Making
 
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Since the first reissuance of Bonds in 2003, the DMO has raised trillions of Naira for the financing of public projects and the revival of the FGN Bond Market has spurred State Governments to raise funds via Bond Issuance. However, the NSE is setting up the Retail Bond Market to complement Over the Counter Trading (OTC) but to complement the structure by opening up participation in the Bond space to retail investors who otherwise would have been excluded.
Views: 137 WebTV Nigeria
Alan Greenspan Is 'Nervous' Bond Prices Are Too High
 
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July 28 -- Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman and founder of Greenspan Associates, discusses nervousness over bond prices and moving into currencies to counter negative interest rates, as well as dealing with uncertainties in the global economy. He speaks with Bloomberg's Alix Steel on "Bloomberg ‹GO›."
Views: 28745 Bloomberg
Business Morning: Analysing Stocks,NASD OTC,Bills,Bonds & FX Markets Pt 1
 
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Views: 110 Channels Television
FMDQ OTC prepares to launch the Green Bond Market Development Program
 
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As the FMDQ OTC securities exchange prepares to launch the Nigerian Green Bond Market Development Program. Tumi Sekoni, Associate Executive Director for Capital Markets at FMDQ joins CNBC Africa to demystify the concept of green bonds as an alternative financing instrument for stakeholders. https://www.cnbcafrica.com/videos/
Views: 199 CNBCAfrica
IQ OPTION 2019 HINDI : Live Trade On Ranging market: OTC Ranging Bond Market
 
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Create IQ Option Account: http://bit.ly/2LcjGxH BOTT Mentorship Program PRO Plan (4 week crash course)  http://bit.ly/2SMaO4P bo turbo trader price action bible - bo turbo trader pdf (1 edition) http://bit.ly/2B8WCvu bo turbo trader price action guide - bo turbo trader pdf (7 edition) http://bit.ly/2RKq9lG Open your Skrill Account : http://bit.ly/2OvIUY9 Blogger account: http://bit.ly/2PVQ5ha My YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/2qEoHWH My Fcaebook Page: http://bit.ly/2OEf7wB Join our Google Discussion Group: http://bit.ly/2JSCe5H My Google Plus Page: http://bit.ly/2zRir23 Twitter account: http://bit.ly/2FrBJkD Tumblr account: http://bit.ly/2OC5hLm #RocketBOTurboTrading #rangingmarket #otcmarket Risk Warning: Your invested capital may be at risk. This video is not an investment advice. Indicators: EMA 3 (blue) EMA 20 (yellow) EMA 50 (orange) EMA 100 (red) EMA 200 (purple) Bollinger Band Period 20 Deviation 2 (green) Bollinger Band Period 20 Deviation 1 (white) A range-bound market is one in which price bounces in between a specific high price and low price. The basic idea of a range-bound strategy is that a currency pair has a high and low price that it normally trades between. The market is said to be ranging when the price of a financial instrument is making the same highs and lows a number of times. The most common definition of a ranging market is when the price hits the same support and resistance levels three times. A sideways market occurs where the price trend of a certain trading instrument, such as a stock, has been experiencing neither an uptrend nor a downtrend. Instead, the price activity has been oscillating between a relatively narrow range without forming any distinct trends. Range trading is a strategy whereby a trader identifies overbought and oversold areas (or support and resistance areas) and buys at the oversold area (support) and sells at the overbought area (resistance). The strategy works well in markets that are meandering up and down with no discernable long-term trend. A range-bound market is observed as a trading strategy that identifies stocks trading in channels. By finding major support and resistance levels with technical analysis, a range-bound trader buys stocks at the lower level of support (bottom of the channel) and sells them near resistance (top of the channel). A market that is trending in one direction or another. A bull market is trending upward, while a bear market is trending downward. A trending market can be classified as such for either the short, mid or long term. Range trading is one of many viable trading strategies available to Forex traders. These strategies are generally associated with lack of market direction and can be a handy tool to have in the absence of a trend. At its core, range trading strategies can be broken down into three easy steps! A trading range is the spread between the high and low prices traded during a period of time. For traders who use charts and technical analysis, identifying trends and ranging or range-bound markets is an important aspect of their trading strategy. ranging market vs trending market ranging market indicator mt4 how to know if a market is trending or ranging range bound market what is a ranging market in forex what is trending market range bound market indicators how to trade range bound markets IQ Option 2 Minutes Strategy IQ Option Indicators IQ Option Winning Strategy IQ Option 60 Seconds Strategy IQ Option 60 Seconds Indicators IQ Option Tricks IQ Option Guaranteed Methods IQ Option Guaranteed Strategy IQ Option Guaranteed Tricks #iqoption #pocketoption
Unsupervised Over the counter markets - Part 2
 
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(www.abndigital.com) On today's programme, we look into the emergence of over-the-counter markets in Nigeria. These markets enable the trade of securities such as stocks, bonds and derivatives without the supervision of a recognized securities exchange.
Views: 165 CNBCAfrica
Going Public On The OTC Market
 
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Securities LawCast©- Legal & Compliance, LLC- Going Public On The OTC Market Going Public On The OTC Market. OTCQB, To be eligible to be quoted on the OTCQB, all companies will be required to: Meet a minimum closing bid price on OTC Markets of $.01 for each of the last 30 calendar days; In the event that there is no prior public market and a 15c2-11 application has been submitted to FINRA by a market maker, OTC Markets can waive the bid requirement at its sole discretion; In the event that a Company is a seasoned public issuer that completed a reverse stock split within 6 months prior to applying to the OTCQB, the Company must have a post reverse split minimum bid price of $.01 at the close of business on each of the 5 consecutive trading days immediately before applying to the OTCQB; In the event the Company is moving to the OTCQB from the OTCQX, it must have a minimum closing bid price of $.01 for at least one (1) of the 30 calendar days immediately preceding; Companies may not be subject to bankruptcy or reorganization proceedings the Company’s application; Either be subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and be current in such reporting obligations or, if an international issuer, be eligible to rely on the registration exemption found in Exchange Act Rule 12g-2(b) and be current and compliant in such requirements or be a bank current in its reporting obligations to its bank regulator; Not be in bankruptcy or reorganization proceedings; Be duly organized, validly existing and in good standing under the laws of each jurisdiction in which it is organized and does business; Submit an application and pay an application and annual fee; Maintain a current and accurate company profile on the OTC Markets website; Use an SEC registered transfer agent and authorize the transfer agent to provide information to OTC Markets about the Company securities, including but not limited to, shares authorized, shares issued and outstanding, and share issuance history; and Submit an OTCQB Annual Certification confirming the accuracy of the current company profile and providing information on officers, directors and controlling shareholders. All companies are required to post their initial disclosure on the OTC Markets website and make an initial certification. The initial disclosure includes: Confirmation that the Company is current in its SEC reporting obligations and has filed all reports with the SEC, that all financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and that the auditor opinion is not adverse, disclaimed or qualified; International Companies - (i) Companies subject to the Exchange Act reporting requirements must be current in such reports; (ii) A company that is not an SEC Reporting Company must be current and fully compliant in its obligations under Exchange Act Rule 12g3-2(b), if applicable, and shall have posted in English through the OTC Disclosure & News Service or an Integrated Newswire, the information required to be made publicly available pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 12g3-2(b) for the preceding 24 months (or from inception if less than 24 months); and all financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and that the auditor opinion is not adverse, disclaimed or qualified; Verification that the Company profile is current, complete and accurate; All companies will be required to file an initial and annual certification on the OTC Markets website, signed by the CEO and/or CFO, stating: The company’s reporting standing (i.e., whether SEC reporting, bank reporting or international reporting) and briefly describing the registration status of the company; If the Company is an International Company and relying on 12g3-2(b), that it is current in such obligations; That the company is current in its reporting obligations to its regulator and that such information is available either on EDGAR or the OTC Markets website; States the law firm and/or attorneys that assist the company in preparing its annual report or 10-K; Confirms that the company profile on the OTC Markets website is current and complete; Identifies any third-party providers engaged by the Company, its officers, directors or controlling shareholders, during the prior fiscal year and up to the date of the certification, to provide investor relations services, public relations services, stock promotion services or related services; Confirms the total shares authorized, outstanding and in the public float as of that date; and Names and shareholdings of all officers and directors and shareholders that beneficially own 5% or more of the total outstanding shares, including beneficial ownership of entity shareholders. Laura Anthony, Esq. Founding Partner Legal & Compliance LLC. 330 Clematis Street, Ste. 217 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: Toll Free: (800) 341-2684 FREE Local: (561) 514-0936 Email: [email protected] #LawCast
Life Cycle of a Bond
 
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Discover the process of how an idea becomes a bond!
Views: 2040 Neighborly
What is BOND MARKET? What does BOND MARKET mean? BOND MARKET meaning, definition  (English Subtitle)
 
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What is BOND MARKET? What does BOND MARKET mean? BOND MARKET meaning - BOND MARKET definition - BOND MARKET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The bond market (also debt market or credit market) is a financial market where participants can issue new debt, known as the primary market, or buy and sell debt securities, known as the secondary market. This is usually in the form of bonds, but it may include notes, bills, and so on. Its primary goal is to provide long-term funding for public and private expenditures. The bond market has largely been dominated by the United States, which accounts for about 44% of the market. As of 2009, the size of the worldwide bond market (total debt outstanding) is an estimated at $82.2 trillion, of which the size of the outstanding U.S. bond market debt was $31.2 trillion according to Bank for International Settlements (BIS), or alternatively $35.2 trillion as of Q2 2011 according to Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). The bond market is part of the credit market, with bank loans forming the other main component. The global credit market in aggregate is about 3 times the size of the global equity market. Bank loans are not securities under the Securities and Exchange Act, but bonds typically are and are therefore more highly regulated. Bonds are typically not secured by collateral (although they can be), and are sold in relatively small denominations of around $1,000 to $10,000. Unlike bank loans, bonds may be held by retail investors. Bonds are more frequently traded than loans, although not as often as equity. Nearly all of the average daily trading in the U.S. bond market takes place between broker-dealers and large institutions in a decentralized over-the-counter (OTC) market. However, a small number of bonds, primarily corporate ones, are listed on exchanges. Bond trading prices and volumes are reported on FINRA's Trade Reporting and Compliance Engine, or TRACE. An important part of the bond market is the government bond market, because of its size and liquidity. Government bonds are often used to compare other bonds to measure credit risk. Because of the inverse relationship between bond valuation and interest rates (or yields), the bond market is often used to indicate changes in interest rates or the shape of the yield curve, the measure of "cost of funding". The yield on government bonds in low risk countries such as the United States or Germany is thought to indicate a risk-free rate of default. Other bonds denominated in the same currencies (U.S. Dollars or Euros) will typically have higher yields, in large part because other borrowers are more likely than the U.S. or German Central Governments to default, and the losses to investors in the case of default are expected to be higher. The primary way to default is to not pay in full or not pay on time.
Views: 9 Marketing
Financial Markets and Institutions - Lecture 02
 
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payable, due, asset classes, stocks, bonds, real estate, currency, commodities, gain, capital gain, realized gain, dividend, coupon, interest, rent, commission, broker, lease, lease rate, derivatives, financial derivatives, exchange, organized exchange, financial exchange, OTC, over-the-counter, commercial paper, fed funds, repo, repurchase agreement, treasury bill, negotiable CD, negotiable, acceptance, common stock, preferred stock, mortgage, mortgage loan, mortgage bond, corporate bond, government bond, municipal bond, regulation, regulatory agency, appreciate, appreciation, depreciate, depreciation, investment period, investment horizon, risk, diversification, hedging,
Views: 19447 Krassimir Petrov
Creating an African credible OTC market
 
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CNBC Africa's Brigid Taylor caught up with Bola Onadele, CEO for FMDQ, at the 4th annual Trading Africa Summit in Cape Town. They discussed secondary bond markets in Nigeria and creating a credible OTC market that has high integrity.
Views: 138 CNBCAfrica
What is the stock market?
 
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What is the stock market? The stock market refers to the collection of markets and exchanges where the issuing and trading of equities (stocks of publicly held companies), bonds and other sorts of securities takes place, either through formal exchanges or over-the-counter markets. Also known as the equity market, the stock market is one of the most vital components of a free-market economy, as it provides companies with access to capital in exchange for giving investors a slice of ownership. How Does the Stock Market Work? The stock market can be split into two main sections: the primary market and the secondary market. The primary market is where new issues are first sold through initial public offerings (IPOs). Institutional investors typically purchase most of these shares from investment banks; the worth of the company "going public" and the amount of shares being issued determine the opening stock price of the IPO. All subsequent trading goes on in the secondary market, where participants include both institutional and individual investors. (A company uses money raised from its IPO to grow, but once its stock starts trading, it does not receive funds from the buying and selling of its shares). Read more: Stock Market http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/stockmarket.asp#ixzz4o2iW3YHi Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
Views: 363 Business Time
Nigeria's Bond Market: FMDQ OTC Strategies For Year 2018 |Business Morning|
 
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For more information log on to http://www.channelstv.com
Views: 134 Channels Television
How Do You Buy Over The Counter Stocks?
 
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How to buy over the counter stock otc 101 frequently asked questions general market faqs markets homepage. This means here is a link how to find and buy penny stock with etrade step by video of search, e trade. Understand how 'over the counter' stock trading works. Buy an over the counter stock? Investopedia. Where do i go to make an otc (over the counter) transaction how you buy stocks? Theotcinvestor. Unlike the nyse and buying otc stocks. Simply type in the 12 jan 2016 over counter trading is a corner of investing world that some may identified brokers to post bids and offers buy sell securities you can invest stocks trade on us exchanges with your capital one are traded (otc), but there 15 aug read fidelity's viewpoint risky strategy here. Googleusercontent search. Stock trading buy stocks online scotia itrade scotiabank. North american exchanges or pick from stocks sold over the counter in canada and u. Learn more scotia itrade clients can choose from a wide range of stocks. Official site of the otcqx, otcqb and over counter (finance) wikipedia. Buy an over the counter stock? Investopedia how do i buy Investopedia investopedia ask answers 06 buyotc. Investing in penny stocks fidelity. Stocks to be those that trade for less than $1 and or over the counter on otc schemes where unscrupulous investors buy stock, actively promote only its stocks online just $4. Lacking a major exchange listing, these securities are get answers to frequently asked questions about the otc market level 2, what hours for trading of otcqx, otcqb and pink securities? To quoted as security, company must find stock & bond quotes, trade prices, charts, financials news information over counter (otc) or off is done directly between two parties, without supervision an. Real time quotes and advanced stock screeners along with market news, commentary analyst reports are all tools of otc trading 8 feb 2017 find the place to buy penny stocks online offers include up $600 often called or over counter a lot not listed on major exchanges, such as new york exchange. Unraveling the mystery of over counter trading stock market what is an stock? Youtube. How to buy otc stocks on etrade quora. Asp url? Q webcache. An investor can choose from either a discount broker or full service to invest. How to buy penny stocks without a broker 10 steps (with pictures). Penny stocks are not traded on major exchanges, and instead 'over the counter. It is contrasted with exchange 4 jan 2016 over the counter trading a corner of investing world that some may identified brokers to post bids and offers buy sell securities 8 feb 2009. Unraveling the mystery of over counter trading motley fool. Capital one investing stock list sharebuilder. However, investors should be aware that not all brokers allow trading in otc securities the phrase 'over counter' can used to refer stocks trade via a bank makes market bond and asks for quotes buy or sell 5 feb 2015 many penny 'pump dump' otc, so wary; there are sti
How a Stock Exchange Works: "Work of the Stock Exchange" 1941 Coronet Instructional Films
 
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Financial Classic Films playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE7527E1C9F0B138B more at http://money.quickfound.net "Examines each step of incorporation and listing of stock. Illustrates the details of buying and selling operations on the exchange floor and in the broker's office, showing how these operations bring to land, labor and management the necessary capital for production." Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_exchange Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A stock exchange is a form of exchange which provides services for stock brokers and traders to buy or sell stocks, bonds, and other securities. Stock exchanges also provide facilities for issue and redemption of securities and other financial instruments, and capital events including the payment of income and dividends. Securities traded on a stock exchange include stock issued by listed companies, unit trusts, derivatives, pooled investment products and bonds. Stock exchanges often function as "continuous auction" markets, with buyers and sellers consummating transactions at a central location, such as the floor of the exchange. To be able to trade a security on a certain stock exchange, it must be listed there. Usually, there is a central location at least for record keeping, but trade is increasingly less linked to such a physical place, as modern markets are electronic networks, which gives them advantages of increased speed and reduced cost of transactions. Trade on an exchange is by members only. The initial public offering of stocks and bonds to investors is by definition done in the primary market and subsequent trading is done in the secondary market. A stock exchange is often the most important component of a stock market. Supply and demand in stock markets are driven by various factors that, as in all free markets, affect the price of stocks (see stock valuation). There is usually no compulsion to issue stock via the stock exchange itself, nor must stock be subsequently traded on the exchange. Such trading is said to be off exchange or over-the-counter. This is the usual way that derivatives and bonds are traded. Increasingly, stock exchanges are part of a global market for securities. In recent years, various other trading venues, such as electronic communication networks, alternative trading systems and "dark pools" have taken much of the trading activity away from traditional stock exchanges... The Dutch East India Company, formed to build up the spice trade, operated as a colonial ruler... Control of the company was held tightly by its directors, with ordinary shareholders not having much influence on management or even access to the company's accounting statements. However, shareholders were rewarded well for their investment. The company paid an average dividend of over 16 percent per year from 1602 to 1650. Financial innovation in Amsterdam took many forms. In 1609, investors led by one Isaac Le Maire formed history's first bear syndicate, but their coordinated trading had only a modest impact in driving down share prices, which tended to be robust throughout the 17th century. By the 1620s, the company was expanding its securities issuance with the first use of corporate bonds. Joseph de la Vega, also known as Joseph Penso de la Vega and by other variations of his name, was an Amsterdam trader from a Spanish Jewish family and a prolific writer as well as a successful businessman in 17th-century Amsterdam. His 1688 book Confusion of Confusions... was the earliest book about stock trading... William sought to modernize England's finances to pay for its wars, and thus the kingdom's first government bonds were issued in 1693 and the Bank of England was set up the following year. Soon thereafter, English joint-stock companies began going public. London's first stockbrokers, however, were barred from the old commercial center known as the Royal Exchange, reportedly because of their rude manners. Instead, the new trade was conducted from coffee houses along Exchange Alley. By 1698, a broker named John Castaing, operating out of Jonathan's Coffee House, was posting regular lists of stock and commodity prices. Those lists mark the beginning of the London Stock Exchange... and by the 1790s shares were being traded in the young United States...
Views: 1867 Jeff Quitney
Basic Economics: the stock market explained in two minutes!
 
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A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares), which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. Examples of the latter include shares of private companies which are sold to investors through equity crowdfunding platforms. Stock exchanges list shares of common equity as well as other security types, e.g. corporate bonds and convertible bonds. Stocks can be categorised in various ways. One way is by the country where the company is domiciled. For example, Nestlé and Novartis are domiciled in Switzerland, so they may be considered as part of the Swiss stock market, although their stock may also be traded on exchanges in other countries, for example, as American Depository Receipts (ADRs) on U.S. stock markets. At the close of 2012, the size of the world stock market (total market capitalisation) was about US$55 trillion.[1] By country, the largest market was the United States (about 34%), followed by Japan (about 6%) and the United Kingdom (about 6%).[2] These numbers increased in 2013.[3] As of 2015, there are a total of 60 stock exchanges in the world with a total market capitalization of $69 trillion. Of these, there are 16 exchanges with a market capitalization of $1 trillion or more, and they account for 87% of global market capitalization. Apart from the Australian Securities Exchange, these 16 exchanges are based in one of three continents: North America, Europe and Asia.[4] A stock exchange is a place where, or an organization through which, individuals and organisations can trade stocks. Many large companies have their stock listed on a stock exchange. This makes the stock more liquid and thus more attractive to many investors. It may also act as a guarantor of settlement. Other stocks may be traded "over the counter" (OTC), that is, through a dealer. Some large companies will have their stock listed on more than one exchange in different countries, so as to attract international investors.[5] Stock exchanges may also cover other types of securities, such as fixed interest securities (bonds) or (less frequently) derivatives, which are more likely to be traded OTC. Stock market stock market stock market How to make money on the stock market Trade in stock markets means the transfer for money of a stock or security from a seller to a buyer. This requires these two parties to agree on a price. Equities (stocks or shares) confer an ownership interest in a particular company. Participants in the stock market range from small individual stock investors to larger trader investors, who can be based anywhere in the world, and may include banks, insurance companies or pension funds, and hedge funds. Their buy or sell orders may be executed on their behalf by a stock exchange trader. Some exchanges are physical locations where transactions are carried out on a trading floor, by a method known as open outcry. This method is used in some stock exchanges and commodity exchanges, and involves traders shouting bid and offer prices. The other type of stock exchange has a network of computers where trades are made electronically. An example of such an exchange is the NASDAQ. A potential buyer bids a specific price for a stock, and a potential seller asks a specific price for the same stock. Buying or selling at the market means you will accept any ask price or bid price for the stock. When the bid and ask prices match, a sale takes place, on a first-come, first-served basis if there are multiple bidders or askers at a given price. The purpose of a stock exchange is to facilitate the exchange of securities between buyers and sellers, thus providing a marketplace. The exchanges provide real-time trading information on the listed securities, facilitating price discovery. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is a physical exchange, with a hybrid market for placing orders electronically from any location as well as on the trading floor. Orders executed on the trading floor enter by way of exchange members and flow down to a floor broker, who submits the order electronically to the floor trading post for the Designated Market Maker ("DMM") for that stock to trade the order. The DMM's job is to maintain a two-sided market, meaning orders to buy and sell the security if there are no other buyers and sellers. If a spread exists, no trade immediately takes place—in this case the DMM may use their own resources (money or stock) to close the difference. Once a trade has been made, the details are reported on the "tape" and sent back to the brokerage firm, which then notifies the investor who placed the order. Computers play an important role, especially for program trading.
Views: 291 Ghurra Productions
Financial Derivatives - Lecture 01
 
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derivatives, risk management, financial speculation, financial instrument, underlying asset, financial asset, security, real asset, intrinsic, asset classes, primary asset classes, secondary asset classes, stocks, bonds, real estate, currencies, stock derivatives, interest-rate derivatives, fixed-income derivatives, stock-index derivatives, exchange rate, exchange rate derivatives, currency derivatives, commodity derivatives, mortgage, mortgage derivatives, leverage, leveraged pyramid, mortgage-backed security, credit derivatives, Credit Default Swaps, derivative of a derivative, second-degree derivative, option, call option, put option, strike, maturity, forward, futures, long, short, financial markets, over-the-counter market, organized exchange, regulated exchange, financial institution, swaps,
Views: 37716 Krassimir Petrov
Dave Kranzler: OTC Derivatives Meltdown Soon?
 
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Jason Burack of Wall St for Main St had back on former Wall Street bond trader, investor, investment analyst and precious metals fund manager, Dave Kranzler of Investment Research Dynamics http://investmentresearchdynamics.com/ for an interview. Dave's articles also appear on Seeking Alpha. During this 30+ minute interview, Jason asks Dave about Janet Yellen's recent comments about how inflation in food was not a problem and how there's no asset bubbles due to Fed intervention from QE and artificially cheap interest rates. Dave says Yellen is more like a politician and Dave talks about the other 2 recent past Fed Chairmen, Alan Greenspan and Ben Bernanke. Next, Jason asks Dave why the economic and political elites have been able to keep the game going longer than many experts think was possible? Dave points to nearly unlimited fiat money. Dave thinks an OTC derivatives market collapse will happen in the near future which will trigger collapses in bonds, banks, etc. The need for more bank bailouts should only increase going forward for these Keynesian interventionists and central planners who don't want to allow anyone to fail. Jason and Dave talk about how fiat money makes the entire economy immoral and corrupt. Next, Jason asks Dave about the real estate market. Dave thinks the real estate market's "recovery" is now over and will only get worse. Finally, Jason wraps up the interview by asking Dave about Gold, Silver and some mining stock picks he likes that he has in depth research reports for sale on his website. Please visit the Wall St for Main St website here http://www.wallstformainst.com/ Follow Jason Burack on Twitter @JasonEBurack Follow Mo Dawoud on Twitter @m0dawoud Follow John Manfreda on Twitter @JohnManfreda Follow Wall St for Main St on Twitter @WallStforMainSt Also, please take 5 minutes to leave us a good iTunes review here! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wall-street-for-main-street/id506204437
Views: 2501 WallStForMainSt
Hindalco Share Price fall down Buy hold or exit
 
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Share Ka Bazzar I #YOUNGINDIAKAINVESTMENT I https://www.facebook.com/sharekabazzar The stock market refers to the collection of markets and exchanges where the issuing and trading of equities (stocks of publicly held companies), bonds and other sorts of securities takes place, either through formal exchanges or over-the-counter markets. Also known as the equity market, the stock market is one of the most vital components of a free-market economy, as it provides companies with access to capital in exchange for giving investors a slice of ownership.
Views: 1048 Share Ka Bazzar
How to Trade Futures - 90 Minute Futures Trading Lesson for Beginner with Lachlan Elsworth
 
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If you would like to learn to trade futures really well, then watch this video and download my book: http://www.ilovetrading.com.au/. Many traders do not realize that Futures trading is one of the fastest growing trading disciplines in the world. Why? The Futures markets, when traded correctly, cannot be manipulated by Brokers in any way shape or form... and I think that is really cool!. Many beginner traders who want to learn how to trade Futures do not realize that there are effectively two types of markets in the world, OTC and Non-OTC. MARKET TYPE 1 (OTC). OTC stands for 'over the counter' trading. In this situation, a trader is forced to use a Broker to take their trade, just like a FOREX Trader is forced to use a FOREX Broker. The issue this trader now faces is that they are trading to and from their OTC Broker, not to and from the actual global markets. Because this trader is now trading to and from the OTC Broker, this Broker can now manipulate the market, in the Brokers favor, whenever the Broker wants to. The most popular manipulation techniques include 'stop loss hunting' and 'taking the other side', which is a little Broker secret term for trading against you. The sad thing is, this is an OTC Industry wide problem and extends to CFD's, Options and Binary Options. They are all OTC Markets by their very design. If you want to read my book on the subject, go to http://www.ilovetrading.com.au/ and download "Binary Options, Scam or Real Trading, you be the Judge". It is free and yours to keep! MARKET TYPE 2 (Non_OTC). The alternative to FOREX, a Futures Contract, allows you to trade currencies in a Non-OTC Trading environment. This means that you are trading to and from a regulated exchange, like the CME (Chicago Mercantile Exchange), not trading to and from an OTC Broker. In this Non-OTC trading environment, there are no OTC Brokers, hence there is no one to manipulate the market against you while you are trading. You can learn how to trade Currencies and just get on with the job of being a great trader. You can also forget all about trading currencies using a FOREX Broker, you simply do not need them anymore! I say awesome!!! Have an amazing trading day!!! Lachlan Elsworth. http://www.ilovetrading.com.au/
Views: 523 I.Love.Trading
Arun Jaitley Uses James Bond Analogy To Counter Rahul Gandhi’s Rafale Charge
 
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Congress has released an audio tape and has claimed that Manoj Parrikar has Rafale files. CNBC-TV18 is India's No.1 Business medium and the undisputed leader in business news. The channel's benchmark coverage extends from corporate news, financial markets coverage, expert perspective on investing and management to industry verticals and beyond. CNBC-TV18 has been constantly innovating with new genres of programming that helps make business more relevant to different constituencies across India. India's most able business audience consumes CNBC-TV18 for their information & investing needs. This audience is highly diversified at one level comprising of key groups such as business leaders, professionals, retail investors, brokers and traders, intermediaries, self-employed professionals, High Net Worth individuals, students and even homemakers but shares a distinct commonality in terms of their spirit of enterprise. Subscribe to our Channel: https://goo.gl/hKwgtm Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cnbctv18india/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CNBCTV18News Website: http://www.moneycontrol.com/cnbctv18/
Views: 318 CNBC-TV18
RELIANCE INFRA SHARE TARGET I BUY HOLD OR EXIT
 
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Share Ka Bazzar I #YOUNGINDIAKAINVESTMENT I https://www.facebook.com/sharekabazzar The stock market refers to the collection of markets and exchanges where the issuing and trading of equities (stocks of publicly held companies), bonds and other sorts of securities takes place, either through formal exchanges or over-the-counter markets. Also known as the equity market, the stock market is one of the most vital components of a free-market economy, as it provides companies with access to capital in exchange for giving investors a slice of ownership.
Views: 18 Share Ka Bazzar

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