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Language Learning Strategies | Strategies of Language Learning
 
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Language learning strategies is a term referring to the processes and actions that are consciously deployed by language learners to help them to learn or use a language more effectively. They have also been defined as ‘thoughts and actions, consciously chosen and operationalized by language learners, to assist them in carrying out a multiplicity of tasks from the very outset of learning to the most advanced levels of target language performance’. The term language learner strategies, which incorporates strategies used for language learning and language use, is sometimes used, although the line between the two is ill-defined as moments of second language use can also provide opportunities for learning. History: Language learning strategies were first introduced to the second language literature in 1975, with research on the good language learner. At the time it was thought that a better understanding of strategies deployed by successful learners could help inform teachers and students alike of how to teach and learn languages more effectively. Initial studies aimed to document the strategies of good language learners. In the 80s the emphasis moved to classification of language learning strategies. Strategies were first classified according to whether they were direct or indirect, and later they were strategies divided into cognitive, metacognitive or affective/social categories. In 1990, Rebecca Oxford published her landmark book "Language Learning Strategies: What Every Teacher Should Know" which included the "Strategy Inventory for Language Learning" or "SILL", a questionnaire which was used in a great deal of research in the 1990s and early 2000s. Controversy over basic issues such as definition grew stronger in the late 1990s and early 2000s, however, with some researchers giving up trying to define the concept in favour of listing essential characteristics. Others abandoned the strategy term in favour of "self regulation". Classification of language learning strategies: O'Malley and Chamot classification: In 1990, O'Malley and Chamot developed a classification of three types of language learning strategies:  Metacognitive strategies, which involved thinking about (or knowledge of) the learning process, planning for learning, monitoring learning while it is taking place, or self-evaluation of learning after the task had been completed.  Cognitive strategies, which involved mental manipulation or transformation of materials or tasks, intended to enhance comprehension, acquisition, or retention.  Social/affective strategies, which consisted of using social interactions to assist in the comprehension, learning or retention of information. As well as the mental control over personal affect that interfered with learning. This model was based on cognitive theory, which was commended, but it was also criticized for the ad hoc nature of its third category. Oxford taxonomy: Also in 1990, Rebecca Oxford developed a taxonomy for categorizing strategies under six headings:  Cognitive—making associations between new and already known information;  Mnemonic—making associations between new and already known information through use of formula, phrase, verse or the like;  Metacognitive—controlling own cognition through the co-ordination of the planning, organization and evaluation of the learning process;  Compensatory—using context to make up for missing information in reading and writing;  Affective—regulation of emotions, motivation and attitude toward learning;  Social—the interaction with other learners to improve language learning and cultural understanding. In later years this classification system was criticized for its problems in separating mnemonic stratgeies from cognitive strategies, when one is a sub-category of the other, and the inclusion of compensatory strategies, which are connected to how a learner uses the language, rather than learns it. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com
Views: 860 Free Audio Books
Learn English without a Teacher - Learn Alone
 
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https://bit.ly/2JiGy1c Download TONS of FREE PDF lessons to learn English twice as fast!! 📚 You are an English beginner and want to get started with the English language? With this English lesson, you will learn how to learn alone, we will give you the best self-study strategies and tips to be able to master the language without a teacher. This is the perfect lesson for you if you are an English beginner learner! From English vocabulary to pronunciation, your English level will never be the same again! ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ENGLISHCLASS101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wwwEnglishClass101com Also, please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks!
Speak English Fluently - 5 Steps to Improve Your English Fluency
 
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In this lesson, you can learn how to speak more fluently in English. How long have you been studying English? Do you find sometimes that even though you study hard, you can’t speak fluently? Do you learn lots of grammar and vocabulary, but you find it difficult to make sentences when you speak. In this lesson, we’re going to talk about fluency and what you can do to change this situation and improve your English fluency. See the full version of this free English lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/speak-english-fluently You can learn: - What fluency means and what different skills you need to work on to improve your English fluency. - The one most important thing you can do to for fluent English. - How to deal with pressure, nervousness and shyness when speaking English. - How to use reading aloud to improve the speed and fluency of your spoken English. - How to use songs to improve your spoken fluency in English. - A simple but effective vocabulary-learning technique that will make it easier to speak and respond fluently and naturally. SUBSCRIBE to continue improving your English! https://goo.gl/UUQW8j See more free English lessons on this page: http://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons
Views: 2270329 Oxford Online English
Strategies for Teaching Reading 1: Teaching Reading to Young Learners
 
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These ELT Teacher Training Videos from Oxford University Press India aim to address significant and common issues in day-to-day classroom teacher-student interaction. About the video: This video enumerates the strategy of silent reading instead of reading aloud, a common practice in classrooms. He elaborates on the need for pre-reading tasks and recommends an appropriate procedure for reading. About the Author: Dr Ray Mackay is an ELT expert and teacher trainer with more than 30 years experience. He has taught at various schools and colleges in Europe, Africa and South Asia. He has been associated with primary teacher-training and textbook projects in eastern India since 2003 and has also been awarded the MBE for his services to English teaching in India.
Views: 250527 OUPIndia
How to bring CLIL into your classroom
 
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Teach 21st Century skills with confidence: https://elt.oup.com/feature/global/21st-century-skills CLIL, or Content and Language Integrated Learning, is a way of teaching other school subjects through English. Teacher and Oxford Discover author Kathleen Kampa, explains how you can do this, and what the benefits are.
60 Tips: Best classroom techniques for teachers of English
 
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To celebrate the 60th anniversary of International House, we asked EFL experts and have drawn on the expertise of the staff within our schools to share their top tips for the EFL classroom. This video forms the first part of a series of 60 Tips - one for each year of International House - that are our birthday gift to you!
IELTS Speaking Exam - How to Do Part Three of the IELTS Speaking Test
 
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The IELTS speaking exam has three parts. In this lesson, you can learn how to do part three of the IELTS speaking exam, and how to improve your score. You can learn how to make your answers better by adding details and supporting ideas, how to deal with difficult IELTS speaking test questions, and how to interact with the examiner in part three of the IELTS speaking test. See the full version of this free English lesson here: http://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/ielts-speaking-exam-part-three You can learn: - How to extend your answers by adding reasons and examples. - What to do if you can't think of examples to develop your answer. - A simple trick to help you talk more and make any IELTS answer stronger. - How to use filler phrases if you don't know what to say. - What to do if you get a question you really can't answer. You can see more of our free English lessons here: http://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons
Views: 203412 Oxford Online English
How to study efficiently: The Cornell Notes Method
 
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Learn to study faster and more efficiently, and remember more! I will show you my favorite system for taking notes, called the Cornell Notetaking System. You'll learn a way to take better notes and become a better active listener. I'll explain how to use this method and show you an example of it. Using the Cornell template will help you remember more of what you hear in class and help you organize your notes better. This method will help you if you are a student in a high school, language school, or university, or if you attend meetings, conferences, or like studying on your own! You can practice using the Cornell Notetaking Method with this video on the differences between British and American spelling at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BG017jvhB7I , or any other engVid lesson! To test how well you understood this lesson, take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-study-efficiently-the-cornell-notes-method/ Find more free advice on how to take good notes here: http://www.goodluckexams.com/how-to-take-effective-study-notes/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you an amazing way to listen and take notes. This method I am going to teach you today is really, really going to help you, and I know this because I use this method myself, and I found it has really, really helped me when I was in university, during meetings, during all sorts of different situations. This method really works. So, first, before I teach you about the method, I want you to think about yourself and I want you to think about: When do you take notes? Okay? So, when do you listen and when do you take notes? So, some of you might think... Maybe you're in university, maybe you're in college, maybe you're in high school, and you have to listen to your teacher talk, and you have to take notes to help you remember what they are saying. Maybe you've graduated and you're working in a business, and you have meetings and... Or presentations, and you also need to take notes. So, this method will work for whether you're working or you're studying. Maybe you're taking the IELTS or the TOEFL, this can also help you on the TOEFL test in terms of improving your listening and taking notes. So, how do you take notes? Okay? I know some students, they watch their professor or their teacher talk, and they use their computer, and they just type everything their professor or teacher says. Is this something you do? Maybe you write your notes, and you write every single thing your professor says down on a piece of paper, or anything somebody says. Well, there are a couple of problems with these methods, and I'm going to explain to you some of the problems now. So, for people who like to take notes by computer, there are some advantages of this. You're able to type really quickly and you're able to get a lot of what you hear down on your computer, and it's easy to save. But the problem with this is it's a type of passive listening. So, a lot of the times you're not actually using your brain to interpret what you're listening to, and you're not actively listening. You're just copying word for word, you're not actually doing anything active with the material you're listening to. So, working with a computer-and I've seen this in my university-a lot of students also end up going on Facebook during the lesson or lecture. So, a lot of the times they get very distracted. When they should be listening, they're actually not. So, for me personally and I think for a lot of people, using a computer to take notes is not the best method. Again, for some people it might work, but for a lot of people it doesn't. A lot of the times it's actually better to take notes by hand, and the reason is when you take notes by hand, you have to think about what you're writing because writing takes a bit longer than typing. So you're organizing the material, therefore it's more of an active way to listen. Okay? And they've done psychology studies on this, and they do find that taking your notes by hand is often better than taking notes by a computer. So, today I am going to teach you a way to take notes by hand using what is called "The Cornell Method". This method was developed at Cornell University, and a lot of universities actually encourage students to use this method because it is very good. So, what is the Cornell Method? Okay, well, I'm glad you asked. So, I have here an example of how you would organize your paper. Imagine this is your paper that you take your notes on. What you can do is you can make a box just like this where you have a box where you write the title and the date of the lesson, you have a square or a rectangle here, you have a rectangle here, and you have a rectangle at the bottom. Okay? So, in total you have-one, two, three, four-four different rectangles.
Teaching teenagers – how to get their attention and keep it
 
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Trouble keeping your young minds on task? Nicholas Tims, Author of Metro, shares with you some tips to keep your students engaged during English classes. Sign up to receive teaching tips and classroom material straight to your inbox, and take the next step of your learning journey – http://oxelt.gl/metroteachingtips Tried out any of Nick’s tips? Leave a comment below and tell us how they worked for you. Please Note: This video series has been developed specifically for teachers of Teenage learners in Central and South America and refers to course titles that may not be available in every country. Please check with your local Oxford University Press office about title availability.
Advice for a First Grade Teacher : Lesson Plans for Teachers
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Ehow Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/Ehow Being a first grade teacher requires you to look at both your job and your students in a very particular light. Get advice for a first grade teacher with help from a longtime and dedicated educator in this free video clip. Expert: Cristina Gutierrez-Brewster Bio: Cristina Gutierrez-Brewster has successfully improved the reading and writing skills of fifth-through-eighth grade, inner-city youths for six years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: When it comes to being a teacher, you will soon find that your students will teach you every bit as much as you teach them. Learn about important lessons for teachers with help from a longtime and dedicated educator in this free video series.
Views: 191974 eHow
1 Simple Method to Increase Your Vocabulary | The 3R Technique | How to Improve Your Vocabulary
 
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Learn 1 simple method to increase your vocabulary. This is the 3R technique. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you 1 simple method that you can use to increase your vocabulary. This is the technique that I teach my students, and this is also what I use personally to learn new words – so I know that this works. So what is this technique? Well, it’s the 3R method. It’s called 3R because there are three steps: Read, Record and Review. I will show you how to do all three of these correctly to get the best results. So let’s talk about the first step: Read. If there’s one secret to building your vocabulary, it’s reading. There is simply no better way. You should aim to read for an hour per day. If that’s difficult, do at least half an hour, i.e. 30 minutes but one hour per day will give you the most benefit. Now I’m not talking about reading the newspaper or studying textbooks. That kind of reading is good but it’s not the best way to learn new words. For that, you need to read what is interesting. So here’s an idea: pick something that you’re really interested in. Like sports, movies, music, cars, fitness, fashion, electronics etc. - whatever you feel passionate about. Then find material that you will enjoy reading. Some great examples are magazines, novels, short stories or biographies related to your topic. And don’t forget the internet – one of my favorite places for reading online is Wikipedia. There are millions of articles on this site and whatever your topic of interest is, you can go on Wikipedia and find articles to read. Now, there’s something really important. When you read (whether it’s books or online material), there will be many words that are difficult – that you don’t understand. But don’t look up every single one of these in a dictionary. Because that will distract you and make you bored. Instead, your focus should be to just understand the overall idea of what you are reading. For any difficult words, try to guess the meaning from the surrounding information. If you cannot, mark them with a pencil, or write them down and you can come back to them after you finish reading. After you have finished reading, you move on to step 2 – record. This is where you collect new words. So now, you go back to the text you read and find words to learn – there are two types of words that you can learn – unknown words (words that you don’t know), and inactive words (these are words that you have seen before but you’re not sure how to use). Aim to collect about 5-10 new words every day. Once you have the words, you’re going to note them down in a notebook, on your computer (in a Microsoft Word or Excel file) or even your smartphone (there are many apps that will let you save and learn vocabulary). Start by taking your first word and look it up in a dictionary. I personally prefer to use online dictionaries like Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster. And now, you can start to record the word. Let’s look at the best way to do that. In your notebook or file, first write the word - let’s say ‘creative’ is the word you’re learning. From your dictionary, you should then write what part of speech it is (that is, whether it’s a noun, verb, adjective, adverb etc.). This word is an adjective. Then you write its definition – ‘creative’ means ‘having the ability to produce original ideas’ - it can describe people or activities. Then you note any example sentences that you can find or you can make sentences of your own. Here are a couple of examples: “Frank Zappa was a highly creative musician.” “Children enjoy doing creative activities.” Along with this, you should also note down the correct pronunciation of the word in phonetic symbols. This word is pronounced /kri ˈeɪ.tɪv/. There are three syllables – /kri/, /eɪ/, and /tɪv/ with the stress on /eɪ/ – /kriˈeɪ.tɪv/. You might not know these symbols very well, that’s OK. With the dictionary, practice the correct pronunciation a few times, then copy the symbols. Over time, you will become comfortable with them. It’s also a good idea to make a note of the reference – that is, where you learned the word: which book, website etc. Because, later, when you are reviewing the word, you can more easily recall where you saw it, and you can also go to the same website or book if you want to check how it’s used. You should also try to find and note down the different forms of the word. For example, we said that the word ‘creative’ is an adjective. But it has other forms too.
Views: 806879 Learn English Lab
#1 STRATEGY to becoming FLUENT in 2019 [and why you DON'T NEED to 'sound like a native speaker'😱]
 
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HAPPY NEW-YEAR! This video is a MUST WATCH if improving your English is one of your goals for 2019. Learn how to stop wasting your time watching the WRONG video lessons on YouTube, how to make every time you learn something new STICK, what’s the most effective way to enhance your vocabulary and how to own that FLUENT MINDSET that is so crucial when speaking English as a second language (you’ll also learn why I HATE the term “sound like a native speaker”). Join our online community and enjoy English with us: https://theaccentsway.com/fluency-challenge/ SUBSCRIBE to get more fun stuff: https://goo.gl/ixh4b3 Get your journey started (FREE stuff to give you a confidence and fluency boost): 🚀Fluency Challenge & FB Community (Best thing ever): https://goo.gl/68pqeF 🚀American Accent AUDIO crash course: https://goo.gl/wSVyua 🚀50 words you probably mispronounce (interactive list): https://goo.gl/nLtjtW ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Let's Stay Connected:👇🏼 📢Website: http://theaccentsway.com/ ✊ Non-native SPEAKERZ empowering Community (FB): https://goo.gl/68pqeF 📷INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/accentswaybyhadar/ ♥️FACEBOOK: https://facebook.com/TheAccentsWay/ 📧EMAIL: [email protected] - ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Questions you probably want to ask me: 🗣️Are you a native speaker? NO 🌏Where are you from? Tel-Aviv, Israel (I speak Hebrew) ❓ How did you lose your accent? I learned acting in NYC and acquired an American Accent. So I never really lost anything. I also talk about it here: https://goo.gl/PShZ9s 🤔 How can I sound more like a native speaker? You don't have to. A foreign accent is not a bad thing. It's a part of your identity. Of who you are. Your goal should be to sound clear, to have an impact when you speak, and to feel confident in your English voice so that you never let your English hold you back or prevent you from achieving your goals. Aiming for 'speaking like a native' sets the bar so high, you may get discourages and won't even dare to try. #CommunicationOverPerfection 😩What's the worst thing about traditional English training? It's taught as if everyone has the name needs. And it's mostly boring. 🇺🇸Do native speakers think you are American? At first. But later in the conversation, they may detect a subtle accent. Depends on what I'm talking about and how tired I am. I don't care about it too much though, I'm a proud non-native speaker ✊ 🇮🇱🇵🇸What do you think about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? I think land is not worth dying or fighting for. I will always promote peace and co-existence. And for me communication in English is a way to overcome political and cultural barriers. 🎓Do you teach 1:1? I don't. I have an amazing colleague, Natalie, who teaches 1:1 at my school and online using my methods. I also have an online program called Accent Makeover that runs 2-3 times a year. For more: http://theaccentsway.com/ ❤️Who is your inspiration? Marie Forleo. I think every woman should know her. Men too. https://www.marieforleo.com/ 🎥Want to learn more about me? Wach my story: https://goo.gl/csa5iG ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 💜My favorite videos💜 American Intonation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FStyKn4V8cE&t=80s The power of communication: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhrBMjmjSnM&t=2s The schwa (the key to American Pronunciation): https://goo.gl/tvDJ6o Five words you're pronouncing wrong: https://goo.gl/hxy6ov Tips and tricks for better English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raypS... Th made Simple: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7BVQ... The American R: https://youtu.be/DCNjahCAMOU If you've come all the way down here, then read this: You are enough. Speaking English with an accent. Getting stuck. Your voice and your identity make you unique. There are enough Native English speakers out there in the world... You don't need to become another one. Find your own voice. It's important to improve your pronunciation and fluency so you feel more confident and capable. So YOU can express yourself better, and minimize the gap between your native tongue and your English. And If someone makes fun or judges you because of your accent, simply ask back: Oh, and how many languages do YOU speak?! 😏 People who only speak one language don't always understand what it means to overcome the challenges of speaking a foreign language. Don't feel self-conscious. Teach them. ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
How do I motivate my students to speak English instead of their native language in class?
 
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My students are always using their native language in the classroom. How can I motivate them to speak English instead? Joe McVeigh responds. Do you have a question for the Q: Skills for Success authors? We are no longer taking questions. Thank you to everyone who contacted us! Look out for more videos by the Q authors in the coming weeks, or check out the answers that we've posted already in our playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxE1zzJKa1eELHReLfsT-qPbylDsE6OhG
Strategies for Reading Aloud to Young Children
 
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Note: Click the Closed Caption (CC) icon to turn Spanish subtitles on or off. Join Breeyn Mack for a read-aloud of "Wash and Dry." She uses strategies for helping young children to get the most out of the read-aloud experience such as emphasizing vocabulary, commenting on characters, and asking probing questions. Breeyn wraps up the video by reviewing the strategies and giving you tips that you can use right away in your classroom. We'd love to hear what you think! Feel free to leave us a comment or like or share this video! http://www.teachingstrategies.com
The Secret to Remembering Vocabulary
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ OMG, there are too many English words to learn! Well, I can help. Watch this video to learn my own trick for remembering new words. In order to show you how this trick works, I will also teach you the following five words: hammered, creamed, bald, beard, and condo. After watching this video, remembering new words will be a piece of cake. Take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/the-secret-to-remembering-vocabulary/ Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I will teach you a trick on how to remember vocabulary. So English has the largest vocabulary out of any language. I think it's close to 600,000 words in English. So how are you going to remember so much vocabulary? Well, when I was in China, I created a little trick -- and other people use this trick, too -- that really helped me to remember all the new words I was learning. So in this video, I will teach you this trick. So what you do -- I have a bunch of interesting pictures on the board -- is any time you come up across a new word and you're learning a new word, you need to make a picture in your head of this word. A good idea is to try to think of other words that sound like this word and imagine funny situations in your mind. So what do I mean by that? Well, let me show you. The first word I'm going to teach you today is "bald", "bald", b-a-l-d. What does it mean to be "bald"? It means to have no hair, okay? So if you have no hair, you are "bald". How do you remember this word? Well, if you use my trick, you can imagine a word that sounds like "bald" -- maybe "ball", basketball, soccer ball. So in your mind, I want you to imagine a ball. It can be a basketball, a soccer ball -- any type of ball. Now, imagine the ball with a face. Imagine the ball with no hair on top, maybe a little hair on the side, a little hair here, but no hair on the top. Because "ball" and "bald" sound alike, if you imagine this picture for maybe ten seconds, it will help you to remember it in the future, okay? Think "ball with no hair". Okay. Let's try our second word: "beard". What's a beard? It's the hair that comes off a man's chin -- usually, women don't have beards. So it's the hair that comes down like this. How are we going to remember this word? Well, imagine a man with a beard, and inside the beard is a bird, a little bird, tweet tweet! And what's it doing in the beard? Why, it's drinking beer. Okay? So this little picture is -- don't know if you can see that, but that is beer. So imagine a bird drinking beer. Those two words together -- beer. This isn't beer; this one is. Imagine "bird" and "beer". Together, if you put the words together, they make "beard". A bird drinking beer in a beard. Can you say that fast? "Bird drinking beer in a beard." So maybe, if you picture this for ten seconds, you will remember this word. Okay. Next word I want to teach you today: "creamed". So what does it mean to be "creamed"? "We creamed you guys." "You guys got creamed." It means someone lost a game very badly. If our team creamed your basketball team, your basketball team lost; our team won. So you don't want to be "creamed". If you get "creamed", it's bad. It means you lost, you lose. So how can you remember this? Well, imagine someone -- maybe somebody you don't like, somebody you play basketball against or some sport. Imagine throwing a bunch of ice cream and it hits their face -- because the keyword "cream", "ice cream". So if you can imagine ice cream on someone's face, it will help you to remember the word "creamed". So imagine that for ten seconds. So think "ice cream on face", "creamed".
Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques
 
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Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques that will help you speak spontaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content and context. Recorded on October 25, 2014, in collaboration with the Stanford Alumni Association as part of Stanford Reunion Homecoming and the Graduate School of Business Fall Reunion/Alumni Weekend. Speaker: Matt Abrahams, ’91 Matt Abrahams is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching strategic communication; he also teaches public speaking in Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program.
How Communicative Testing helps Learning
 
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Chapter 1: Introduction 0:00 Chapter 2: Why the communicative approach to language learning and assessment? 1:17 Chapter 3: What is communicative language learning all about? 2:12 Chapter 4: Authenticity 6:11 Chapter 5: Using language appropriately 14:07 Chapter 6: Errors are a natural part of learning 18:49 Chapter 7: Linguistic competence: grammar and vocabulary 23:42 Chapter 8: What does this mean for language assessment? 29:35 Chapter 9: Speaking assessment 30:05 Chapter 10: Writing assessment 32:51 Chapter 11: Listening assessment 35:37 Chapter 12: Reading assessment 39:05 Chapter 13: Grammar assessment 43:58 Chapter 14: Summary 47:36 Chapter 15: Q & A 48:24 The term ‘communicative ’can be used very loosely and often just to refer to group work. In this webinar we will look at the principles of the communicative approach to learning, teaching and assessment. In particular, we will focus on the concepts behind communicative language testing and show how it influences what is learned in the classroom and how teachers teach. Presenters Marianne Pickles and Evelina Galaczi Marianne Pickles Marianne is a Senior Assessment Manager at Cambridge Assessment English. She has a Master’s in Language Testing from Lancaster University, for which her dissertation focused on the assessment of expeditious reading at A2 level. She is a CELTA- and Delta-qualified English language teacher and taught for six years in Germany and Spain, where she was also a Speaking examiner for the Cambridge English Qualifications. Marianne’s key areas of interest include the principles and practice of writing exam content as well as how technology can be used to enhance testing and learning. Evelina Galaczi Evelina is Head of Research Strategy at Cambridge English. Her academic background is in Applied Linguistics, and she received her Master’s and Doctorate degrees from Columbia University, USA. Evelina has worked in English language education for over 25 years and her key areas of interest/expertise are the development and assessment of speaking skills, the role of technology in learning and assessment, and ways of communicating research to non-specialist audiences. Evelina regularly presents at international conferences and has published academic papers on speaking assessment, computer-based testing, and professional development for teachers. The slides can be downloaded here: http://assets.cambridgeenglish.org/webinars/june-webinar-communicative-approach-final.pdf
Views: 10817 Cambridge English
FCE Listening Exam Tips and Advice
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about how to do the Cambridge FCE listening exam. We will give you useful FCE listening exam tips and advice you can use. Do you have any to add? Post them in the comments! In this lesson, you can see what to expect in the listening test and how to improve your FCE listening score. We'll also look at some problem areas and what you can do to make them easier. See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/fce-listening-tips . This lesson will help you: - Learn what to expect in each part of the FCE listening exam. - Understand how you can best prepare for the FCE listening exam with methods you can use at home. - Learn what to expect in the FCE listening test and what you can do in each part. - Get an idea of common challenges and mistakes many people face when taking the FCE listening test. - Avoid making those common mistakes! Contents: 1. What to Expect in the FCE Listening Exam 0:21 2. How to Prepare for Your FCE Listening Exam 2:11 3. What to Do During Your FCE Listening Test 5:46 4. Challenges and Avoiding Mistakes in the FCE Speaking Exam 8:12 To see more free English lessons like this, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 26531 Oxford Online English
How to discuss a topic in a group
 
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Five English teachers come together to show you how to discuss a topic in a group. You'll learn how to give your opinion, interrupt, contradict, and more. We'll teach you how to use expressions like "in a nutshell", "please let me finish", and "don't get me wrong". You can use these expressions confidently in personal, social, and professional situations. Make sure to test your understanding of the lesson at https://www.engvid.com/how-to-discuss-a-topic-in-a-group/ To improve your English, subscribe to each of the teachers who appear in this lesson: Ronnie - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=EnglishLessons4U James - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=JamesESL Alex - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AlexESLvid Adam - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=EnglishTeacherAdam Rebecca - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RebeccaESL TRANSCRIPT: Hi! My name is Rebecca, and in today's lesson you'll learn how to participate effectively in a discussion in English, something you may need to do in your personal, professional, or academic life, okay? Now, the topic we'll use as our sample is this one: Is it better to study online or in a regular classroom? Okay? You'll have a chance to hear a discussion by native English speakers on this topic. What I'd like you to do is listen for any special expressions and phrases that they use during the discussion. Afterwards, I'll review the expressions and phrases with you, okay? Now, today I have some special friends who have agreed to help me with this lesson, and they're waiting in the classroom next door, so let's go and say hello to them. -- Hello! -- Hello! -- Hi! -- Hi! -- Well, look who's here. It's -- -- Ronnie. -- Alex. -- James. -- Adam. -- Thank you for joining me, and thanks for helping with this lesson, guys. -- No problem. -- No problem. -- So you know we're talking about discussions, and the topic is: Is it better to study online or in a regular classroom? Okay, who wants to go first? -- Okay, so I'll start, and I think that it's actually very good to study online because it's very convenient because you can study whenever you want and at your own pace. For example, someone like me, I like to study at nighttime. So for me, online works better because it's quiet at night, no one disturbs me, and I can do what I need to do. -- Okay, that's true, but if you're going to study online -- -- Sorry, but -- -- Please let me finish. Let me finish. As I was saying, that's true, but if you're studying online you do need to motivate yourself, so I think it's better to be in a classroom where you have other students and a teacher who can motivate you. -- That's true, but some people can't afford to go to a classroom and don't have enough money or resources to actually go to a big school. So studying online, you can actually do it for free. -- Me? Well, I would like to add -- May I say something? -- Sure. -- Soft skills. That's not usually talked about in schools, but when we talk about "soft skills", it's actual interaction, utilizing your English when you're with other people, and that's hard to get online because you're watching a screen and not actually interacting with other people. -- You make a very good point but I would also like to add that sometimes having classmates takes you away from your focus because you have to maybe review things many times for other people to catch up, or you have to do topics that are interesting to other people, not to yourself. So it's a little distracting sometimes, too. -- However, focus is a good thing. I mean, it's not a bad thing to repeat something because sometimes people don't catch the material the first time. So that way, you go over the material, and they -- you know, you get depth. So you get to learn more, and people who don't understand get the opportunity to ask questions and learn from it again. -- Yeah, but sometimes the resources that you get in a classroom are boring, and online you can just look up whatever you need on the Internet, and you've got it right there. You don't have to rely on a textbook. Sometimes it can be a bad textbook.
5 Tips to Get Band 7 in the IELTS Writing Exam - IELTS Writing Lesson
 
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Do you need band seven in the IELTS writing exam? Are you maybe stuck at band six or 6.5? If you’ve taken the IELTS exam many times, and you can’t seem to get higher than six in the IELTS writing exam, this video is for you. See the full version of this free English lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/get-band-7-ielts-writing-exam Contents: 1. Understanding Band 7.0 Scores 1:18 2. How to Get Band 7.0 in Task Achievement 3:08 3. How to Get Band 7.0 in Coherence & Cohesion 9:53 4. How to Get Band 7.0 in Vocabulary 14:24 5. How to Get Band 7.0 in Grammar 17:31 This lesson will help you: - Understand the IELTS exam and how the IELTS writing is scored. - Learn how to get an IELTS writing score of 7.0 for task achievement. - Find the best way to answer part one in the IELTS writing exam. - Learn how to properly answer part two in the IELTS writing exam. - Understand how to get IELTS Band 7.0 for coherence and cohesion of your writing. - Find different ways to get IELTS Band 7.0 for vocabulary in your writing. - Understand how to use grammar at the IELTS Band 7.0 level. You can see more free English lessons on this page: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons Here are useful links to the resources mentioned in the lesson: https://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/IELTS_task_1_Writing_band_descriptors.pdf https://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/sites/default/files/IELTS_task_2_Writing_band_descriptors.pdf https://quizlet.com/ https://apps.ankiweb.net/
Views: 470913 Oxford Online English
The Teachers' Room: Top tips for giving instructions
 
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What's the best way to give instructions? Join Sian and Dan to find out! Badly given instructions can completely undermine and ruin an interesting, engaging or fun activity. If you have time beforehand, plan what you want to say. Aim to keep your language as short and simple as possible and grade it for your class' level. You wouldn't instruct an elementary student in the same way as an intermediate or advanced student. Think 'What is the minimum amount of information they need to know to be able to do this task. (This is a natural conversation, so no transcript is included.) For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-4/session-4
Views: 43778 BBC Learning English
HOW TO SPEAK ENGLISH BETTER THAN MOST NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS 😃
 
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Start improving your fluency now with the English Fluency Formula audio ebook FREE sample: http://bit.ly/effebook --~-- When we compare standard, correct English to what native speakers usually use in everyday life, there are plenty of discrepancies! Most people in the United States do not speak perfect English; in fact, many common mistakes are actually accepted forms of speech nowadays. Many native American English speakers break grammar rules, they use incorrect sentence structure, and they use vocabulary in what most people would consider the wrong way. Check out our lesson above (and here: https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/better-than-a-native/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=video%20text&utm_content=better-than-a-native) to learn more about these mistakes that even native speakers make so that you're one step ahead of them! You'll be speaking better and more correct English than native speakers in no time. ALL GO NATURAL ENGLISH LESSONS at https://gonaturalenglish.com FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/gonaturalenglish TWITTER: http://twitter.com/gonaturaleng FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/gonaturalenglish
Views: 220890 Go Natural English
Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 934321 Learn English Lab
Introducing new vocabulary to young learners
 
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Ritsuko Nakata, co-author of Let's Go, shares a fun and effective way to introduce new vocabulary to young learners. For more free videos, webinars, articles, sample lessons and advice, visit the Let's Share page at http://oxford.ly/eltshare
How to Write a Band 9 IELTS Essay - IELTS Writing Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can see how to write a band 9.0 IELTS essay. You'll see the techniques and thought processes which you need to get a higher IELTS writing score. See the full version of this lesson with text here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/write-band-9-ielts-essay. This lesson will help you: - Go through the topic for the IELTS essay to make sure you understand how to answer it. - Organize your ideas before you begin writing your IELTS essay. - Understand how to use the introduction, body and conclusion paragraphs in your IELTS essay. - Use the best sentence structure for your IELTS essay. - Learn the best practices to get a band 9 on your IELTS essay. See more general English and IELTS lessons on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 444229 Oxford Online English
Preparing your students for exam success
 
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Making sure students are prepared for future exams is a big part of our roles as teachers. Nicholas Tims, co-author of Metro shares some tips to make it easier for you. Want material so you can try out these tips in your classroom? Sign up below for lesson content and more videos from Nick and James straight to your inbox. http://oxelt.gl/metroteachingtips Have any of these tips worked well in your classroom? Let us know in the comments below. Please Note: This video series has been developed specifically for teachers of Teenage learners in Central and South America and refers to course titles that may not be available in every country. Please check with your local Oxford University Press office about title availability.
How to Learn English in 2019
 
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📚 https://goo.gl/5U8xJ3 Download TONS of FREE PDF lessons to learn English twice as fast!! You are an English beginner and want to get started with the English language? With this English lesson, we will give you the best tips and advice to learn English in 2019, this is the perfect lesson for you if you are an English beginner learner! From English vocabulary to pronunciation, your English level will never be the same again! ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ENGLISHCLASS101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wwwEnglishClass101com Also, please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks!
IELTS – 3 Reading Strategies
 
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Is the IELTS Reading section very challenging for you? Can't finish all the readings and questions before the time is up? In this lesson, you will learn three approaches to the IELTS Reading section and their pros and cons. The goal of this lesson is to help you finish the test on time without compromising your understanding of the readings. Learn how to read less while answering more questions correctly. After watching, make sure to do the quiz to test your understanding. Good luck on your test! https://www.engvid.com/ielts-3-reading-strategies/ https://www.GoodLuckIELTS.com/ https://www.writetotop.com/ WATCH NEXT IELTS Writing: The 3 Essay Types https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ-Vyqxn1To TRANSCRIPT Hi again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about IELTS. As usual, with IELTS lessons, I will be speaking a little bit faster than normal. It's good for your listening practice. But if you're not taking the IELTS, you can still listen and try to follow us as we go through this section. So, let's begin. Today, I'm going to look at the IELTS reading section. I'm going to look at three different approaches to tackling the IELTS reading section. Students always ask me: "What should I do with the reading? How do I do it? How can I finish on time? How can I answer more questions?" Right? So I'm going to give you three approaches, three different ways to try to do the IELTS. Okay? We're going to look at three different ways. They're completely different from each other. The most important thing I want to tell you before we start: you have to know what works for you. Okay? One of these approaches will work for you; the others may not. Practice all three. If you're comfortable with one and it seems to work for you, and your score seems to be getting better, stick with that one and practice that one. Don't try to do all three each time. Figure out which one works, and just practice that one the most. Okay? The most obvious one and the first one we're going to talk about: read the entire passage, and then tackle the questions. Now, a few things to say, good and bad, about this approach. So, you have 20 minutes, let's say, that you're going to start from the first passage, you're going to do about 17 minutes; the second passage, you're going to spend 20 minutes; the last passage, you're going to spend 23, 24, 25 minutes. So, you have to do this very fast. So: can you read the entire passage and do the questions in that timeframe? Okay? That's the question you must ask yourself. Are you a fast reader? Can you comprehend everything you're reading? How is your vocabulary? Things like this. Some people, they must read everything, from beginning to end, and then go to the questions. But they can also keep; they can retain the information they've read, so when they go to the questions, they know where to go back and look for the answers. Now, the good part about this is that you have all the information in your head once you've read the entire passage. The bad part is that you're going to be reading the passage twice. Okay? Or not the whole passage, but you're going to read big chunks of the passage twice. You'll have read it the first time, you'll go to the questions, and then you'll be reading again to find the answers, because you're looking for specific words now. When you get to the questions, sometimes it's only one word difference from what you read in the passage. So, do I recommend this? Yes and no. If you're a fast reader and you can comprehend, then yes, do that. If you're not a fast reader, then no, don't do this. You'll be wasting too much time and reading more than you need to. What I'm going to do with these two approaches is show you how to read less. So you don't need to read the entire passage; you just need to read the areas that contain the answers to the questions. So, the second approach: go straight to the questions. You look at the question. First of all, understand the type of the question. Is it a multiple choice? Is it a fill-in-the-blank, like a summary? Are you looking for like headings for each paragraph? Are you looking for the title? Etc. Figure out what you're looking for, read the question carefully, pick out the keywords in the question or the key idea in the question, and then scan the passage. Don't read the passage. Just quickly look everywhere for where that information ought to be.
IELTS Reading | SUPER METHODS #1 with Jay!
 
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Learn the method you need to crack IELTS Reading for both General and Academic! Our expert teacher Jay from E2Language will guide you through the process. More on our website at: https://www.e2language.com/ Sign up for our free IELTS trial: http://bit.ly/2ntt8Q7 For your continued support please donate small change: http://www.paypal.me/e2language IELTS Webinars are now open to all users! Yes, it’s free to register and participate in this LIVE TRAINING with our IELTS teachers: IELTS General Writing Task 1 – Every Monday! http://bit.ly/2kLJpDB IELTS Academic Writing Task 1 – Every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/2ykS2dq IELTS Writing Task 2 (Academic & General) – Every Wednesday! http://bit.ly/2g6tvPc IELTS Reading (Academic & General) – Every Thursday! http://bit.ly/2gAaepV IELTS Super Methods! – Every Second Friday! http://bit.ly/2yid8aI The IELTS reading section (like all of the IELTS sections) requires a solid method, whether you are taking IELTS general or IELTS academic. Watch our E2 IELTS online webinar with Jay to find out what the magic formula is before taking your next IELTS test. Follow us on social media for helpful tips and updates for IELTS exam preparation and IELTS reading section: Blog: https://blog.e2language.com Forum: https://forum.e2language.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/e2language/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/e2language Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e2language/
Views: 913717 E2 IELTS
7 Ways to Improve English Writing Skills | IELTS | EXAM | ESSAY | ACADEMIC #Spon
 
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How to improve English writing skills! This video will help with IELTS writing, academic writing, formal writing and university writing. I will show you 7 tips for writing exams, including information on IELTS linking words and English formal essay writing grammar and vocabulary. You can get 50USD/50EUR/3750RUB off your first month at Lingoda: http://bit.ly/2y0w6pd Click on the link above and use the voucher code: LUCY3 (Thank you to Lingoda for kindly sponsoring this video! I have worked with Lindoga for a long time now and I really love them as a company) Love, Lucy xoxo MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH OXFORD ENGLISH language course: https://englishll.com/lucy/ Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue £10 free makeup on FeelUnique: http://referme.to/9niUkCo Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCz4tgANd4yy8Oe0iXCdSWfA My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 FAQ: - Where are you from? I grew up in Bedfordshire, a county near London! - How many languages do you speak? I speak fluent Spanish and I'm learning Italian. You can see a video of me speaking Spanish here: https://goo.gl/4RVY0O - Which camera do you use? I use the Canon 60D (Discontinued - updated version here: (http://amzn.to/2z5I7K8) with a 50mm lens (http://amzn.to/2z7kgtq) - Which microphone do you use? I use the SONY ECMCS3 - Very affordable and great value for money: (http://amzn.to/2yOg9Sk) (Note that you will need this mic adapter if you want to use it with your iphone - http://amzn.to/2z6gNeD) I also use the Blue Yeti in vintage white for my voiceover work: http://amzn.to/2z4lHJa http://amzn.to/2yJPjLD - Which editing software do you use? Final Cut Pro X Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a #Spon in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.
Views: 402068 English with Lucy
Learning Power - Teaching with Attitude | Guy Claxton | TEDxNorrkopingED
 
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One of the most significant things that children learn in school is to be taught. They learn the skills and attitudes that are required to thrive (or oppose) a teacher-led environment. In traditional schools the attitudes included passivity, dependence, credulity, instrumentality and timidity. These are compatible with getting good grades, but not with becoming a powerful, independent real-life learner. As adults, our lives are diminished if we carry these attitudes forward with us into work, family life and leisure. The Learning Power Approach is uncovering a way to teach which avoids this pitfall. Guy Claxton is emeritus Professor of the Learning Sciences at the University of Winchester, a post he took up in September 2008 together with the role of Co-Director of the Centre for Real-World Learning (CrL).He previously held the same title at the University of Bristol Graduate School of Education. He has a ‘double first’ from Cambridge and a DPhil from Oxford, and is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and the Royal Society of Arts, and an Academician of the Academy of the Social Sciences. Guy Claxton is the author of more than twenty books including the best selling Building Learning Power. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 8542 TEDx Talks
Introducing question forms to young learners
 
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Ritsuko Nakata, co-author of Let's Go, shares a fun and effective way to introduce new vocabulary to young learners. For more free videos, webinars, articles, sample lessons and advice, visit the Let's Share page at http://oxford.ly/eltshare
Great Teachers, Great Teaching, Great Learning - Professor Graham Donaldson (Keynote)
 
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‘Developing Great Teaching’ was a professional development conference from Oxford University Press. In response to the New Deal, it created a forum to share understanding of exactly what CPD is and what it should look like for practitioners across Wales, and was held jointly with the Teacher Development Trust and the National Association of Head Teachers. In this conference keynote, Professor Graham Donaldson explores the need for professional development for teachers to encourage creative and exciting learning in an ever-evolving working environment. Browse our selection of free resources and videos from the day by registering free on Oxford Owl: https://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/direct-link/great-teaching-cardiff
Views: 1528 Oxford Education
How to use Flash Cards | How to Study | Flashcards Study Tips
 
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Hello Socratica Friends! We're here to help you be a Great Student. In this episode, we learn about the best way to use FLASH CARDS. Flash cards are a great tool to use anytime you need to memorize facts, fast. They're great for drilling vocabulary terms, learning dates in history...so many uses. The best thing about flash cards is that they help you figure out what you know, and what you don’t know. And although this may be uncomfortable, the best way to master a subject is to focus on what you DON’T know! In this video, we'll show you how we use flash cards, using an important technique known as "spaced repetition." Basically, don't try to cram in all your studying in one go! Make sure you break it up over a couple of days at least, with breaks in between. Try using flashcards following the Pomodoro method! Two fantastic techniques working together to help you be a Great Student. We recommend making flashcards the old fashioned way - with pen and paper, but if you'd like to use an app on your phone, we like Anki. Do you have a different method of studying with flash cards? Let us know what are your favourite study tips in the comments! SUBSCRIBE if you want to be notified of our next video! http://bit.ly/SocraticaSubscribe ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ More STUDY TIPS videos: How to Read a Textbook http://bit.ly/ReadTextbooks How to Take Notes http://bit.ly/Cornell_Notes How to Use the Feynman Technique http://bit.ly/TheFeynmanTechnique How to Improve Your Vocabulary http://bit.ly/BuildVocab How to Use Flashcards http://bit.ly/Flashcards_Studytips How to Use the Pomodoro Technique http://bit.ly/PomodoroSocratica How to Do Speed Reading http://bit.ly/SpeedReadStudyTips How to Learn a Foreign Language http://bit.ly/Learn_Lang How to Use Mnemonic Devices http://bit.ly/Memory_StudyTips How to Get Better Search Results http://bit.ly/Google_Tips How to Study For a Test http://bit.ly/Study4Test How to Take a Test http://bit.ly/TakeTests How to Study Physics http://bit.ly/StudyTipsPhysics How to Study Programming http://bit.ly/Learn_Programming 10 Tips for Back to School http://bit.ly/BackToSchool_Tips 5 Reasons to go to Summer School http://bit.ly/SumrStudy If you love Socratica's videos and want to help support our work, consider wearing one of our comfy sweatshirts - as seen in our Study Tips series. Unisex design, machine washable. https://teespring.com/socratica-sweatshirts-are-here ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ We Recommend the following Books and Study Supplies: Cornell-notes style paper http://amzn.to/2dC9bUR Cornell Notes spiral notebook: http://amzn.to/2usl3ip Tomato Timer (use this for the Pomodoro Technique) http://amzn.to/2pMQhyA Moleskine 18 month planner http://amzn.to/2vCKhQl How to Read a Book - classic by Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren https://amzn.to/2QhAgxF Word Power Made Easy http://amzn.to/2no4W4s Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary http://amzn.to/2rSHz7O Roget’s Thesaurus http://amzn.to/2EvmFyf Pilot G2 Extra Fine Pens http://amzn.to/2wwFzSZ The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin (Chess Prodigy) http://amzn.to/2r952QB Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ Don’t forget to check out our FREE educational apps on the Google Play Store. http://bit.ly/2NjBl6j ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ Great Student: Liliana De Castro Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison Products in this video: Oxford Ruled Index Cards, 3" x 5", White, 10 Packs of 100 (31EE) - http://amzn.to/2fEigiZ Sharpie Highlighters, Chisel Tip, Assorted Colors, 10 Pack - http://amzn.to/2fEb8U8
Views: 166545 Socratica
IELTS Speaking | Super Methods with Jay!
 
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We're back in this Live Class on IELTS Super Methods- use the PPF method for IELTS Speaking. Take it from Jay who got 9 in IELTS speaking! Support E2 by donating as little or as much $ as you want: http://www.paypal.me/e2language More at: http://www.e2language.com Read the blog about Jay's IELTS experience: http://bit.ly/2l1kTii Sign up for IELTS here: http://bit.ly/2ntt8Q7 IELTS Webinars are now open to all users! Yes, it’s free to register and participate in this LIVE TRAINING with our IELTS teachers: IELTS General Writing Task 1 – Every Monday! http://bit.ly/2kLJpDB IELTS Academic Writing Task 1 – Every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/2ykS2dq IELTS Writing Task 2 (Academic & General) – Every Wednesday! http://bit.ly/2g6tvPc IELTS Reading (Academic & General) – Every Thursday! http://bit.ly/2gAaepV IELTS Super Methods! – Every Second Friday! http://bit.ly/2yid8aI E2Language offers online face-to-face tutorials run by expert English language teachers from all over the world! Visit our website for IELTS test preparation packages on offer: http://bit.ly/2otr0fi Follow us on social media for helpful tips and updates regarding IELTS preparation and the IELTS speaking: Blog: https://blog.e2language.com Forum: https://forum.e2language.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/e2language/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/e2language Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e2language/
Views: 658185 E2 IELTS
What do top students do differently? | Douglas Barton | TEDxYouth@Tallinn
 
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Douglas talks about the research on top students learning habits. Douglas is the founder and Global Chairman of Elevate Education. Douglas and Elevate has spent the last 13 years benchmarking the practices of the highest performing students in order to identify exactly what drives student performance. Today, Elevate works with over 1200 schools across Australia, the UK, South Africa and the US in order to raise student and school performance. Douglas has been profiled in a series of books on Australia’s top and emerging leaders.​ Douglas on Elevate Education’i looja. Douglas ja Elevate on viimased 13 aastat uurinud heade tulemustega õpilaste harjumusi, et mõista, mis on nende edu võti. Täna töötab Elevate enam kui 1200 kooliga üle terve Austraalia, Suurbritannia, Lõuna-Aafrika Vabariigi ja Ameerika Ühendriikide, et tõsta õpilaste ja koolide taset. Douglast on mainitud ka Austraalia tõusvaid juhte tutvustavas kogumikus. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 2795377 TEDx Talks
Total Physical Response (TPR) - Teacher Training film no. 8
 
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Günter Gerngross demonstrates a TPR sequence with a class of children using Playway Second edition. The children learn vocabulary using mimes, gestures and drawings on the board. Find out more about Playway at www.cambridge.org/elt/playway
IELTS Reading: Top 10 Tips
 
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How to get a high score on the IELTS Reading. In this video, I am going to give you ten important tips that will help you succeed on the reading module of the IELTS. Prepare yourself for test day by watching this class and taking my quiz at the end. http://www.engvid.com/ielts-reading-top-10-tips/ http://www.goodluckielts.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, we are going to talk about the reading module of the IELTS. I'm going to tell you some of my top IELTS reading tips. So let's get started. During the reading module of the IELTS, there will be three passages that you read, and for each passage, there are a bunch of questions you have to answer. The first tip I have for you is: don't spend too much time reading the passages. What happens to a lot of students is they read word-for-word everything. They see a word they don't know, they keep trying to understand the meaning. You don't have to understand everything to understand the passage. If you don't know a word, that's fine. The better thing to do than to slowly read is to use skills such as skimming which means you quickly read for the main idea or scanning, meaning you look for key words or you look for specific detail. A lot of students, what they do for the IELTS is they will actually read the questions first, and then they will read the passage. And that way, they... They know what they're looking for. You don't have to do this; it's one technique. Some students find this a lot easier, other students like to read the passage first and then answer the questions. I recommend trying both out. First do the reading, then the questions, then try to read the questions first and read the passage and see what you like better, what you're more comfortable doing. So the key thing here is: don't read slowly. It's a timed test, you have three parts you have to get through, 40 questions; it's very important that you read quickly. You can start practicing reading quickly also. There are a number of resources out there where you can actually start practicing. And time yourself when you practice, make sure you're not going over time. Number two, similar to number one, my tip is: don't spend too long on each question. Some of the questions are difficult-they're possible, you can do well on them-but some of them, you might be reading and you might think: "Oh, I don't know what the answer is," and you might look at it, and think, and try, and try, and try. Well, the problem is if you spend too much time on a question, there are 40 questions and the one hour limit for the test, it goes by very quickly. So you can spend too much time on each question. So what I recommend is read a question, try to figure out the answer. If you don't know it, you can put a star beside it and come back after. Don't spend too long on any question. You can also take a guess, move on, and come back later. My third tip: spend less time on earlier questions. For the reading module, the... Like I said, there are three passages. The first passage is the easiest, then the second passage, and then the third question. If you spend all your time on the first passage, you're not going to have time to do the second and the third. And, like I said, the first one is easier. So a good idea is to spend less time on the first passage, maybe about 17 minutes, then the second passage maybe spend about 20 minutes, and the third passage maybe 23 minutes. You don't have to follow this exactly, but the main idea is spend less time on part one, more time on part three because part three is harder. My fourth point is: make sure you have enough time to transfer your answers. They will have an answer sheet and you're supposed to write your answers on it. It's very important to leave yourself time to transfer your answers from your test paper to the answer sheet. A lot of students, they work through the booklet and then they realize there's no time to transfer their answers, so make sure you leave time for this.
How long does it take to learn to speak English Fluently?
 
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Start improving your fluency now with the English Fluency Formula audio ebook FREE sample: http://bit.ly/effebook --~-- ⏰ How much time does it really take to become fluent in English? ⏰ Free chapter of The English Fluency Formula: https://goo.gl/va6Qgp 👀 See the full lesson on the blog: http://bit.ly/2M5EJkD How much time does it really take to become fluent in English? Most teachers will tell you that it depends, which is definitely a true statement! But today, we're going to go even deeper into that answer to understand why it depends, and what it depends on. This will guarantee that you make an informed decision, and you'll know exactly what you're getting into, when you commit to learning English with Go Natural English. How do you know how long it will take you to become fluent in English? Well, first, you need to know what level of fluency you want to achieve! Next, what is fluency to YOU? Why do you want to speak English? The answers to these questions are personal, and they are the foundation for your English studies. Take a minute to answer these for yourself, and then you'll be ready to continue your fluency goals. This will keep you motivated throughout your entire learning experience. 👉 FOLLOW ON IG @gonaturalenglish 👉 TWEET US @gonaturaleng 👉 FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/gonaturalenglish IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH FLUENCY WITH GO NATURAL ENGLISH LESSONS ON LISTENING, GRAMMAR, PRONUNCIATION, AMERICAN ACCENT TRAINING, VOCABULARY AND ALL THE SECRETS YOU WON'T LEARN IN A TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM!
Views: 210703 Go Natural English
Teaching English to Kids in 5 Fun Steps
 
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Need help? You can start learning a whole lot more about how to teach English to kids with ESLinsider's advanced course. The advanced course goes into detail especially in regards to classroom management which is often a challenge when you teach kids. It also offers feedback, support and interaction with a real human which is not common in many of the cheaper courses. About the video: These are 5 fun steps to teaching kids English. In this video you'll see a method for teaching kids English using the "PPP" (Presentation, Practice and Production) style of lesson planning. You will learn how to teach English to children and much of this method can also be applied to teaching other levels too. Such as adults. But the "PPP" style is best for low level learners. Also in this video you will learn some fun games and activities that you can add to your lesson. These will make your lessons more fun and more effective if used correctly. This video was filmed in Busan, South Korea. This was a kindergarten class. I suspect the students here were about 5 years old or so. This method or style of teaching ESL will be effective from kindergarten through elementary school for the most part. You can also see an infographic of this: http://www.eslinsider.com/blog/teaching-english-to-kids-in-5-fun-steps-infographic _____________________________________________________ ESLinsider serves up fresh resources for ESL teachers: how-to videos, online TEFL courses, interviews with ESL teachers in Asia, ebooks and a blog. You can learn how to teach English with videos, find solutions to classroom problems, and get ideas for your lessons. It also has a blog where you can learn about teaching and living in Asia: Taiwan, China, Korea and Japan. _____________________________________________________ Resources: http://www.eslinsider.com Blog: http://www.eslinsider.com/blog How-to videos: http://www.eslinsider.com/how-to-teach-english-videos Online TEFL courses - effective, efficient + economical http://www.course.eslinsider.com/ Subscribe and Follow: https://twitter.com/ESLinsider http://www.pinterest.com/eslinsider/ https://www.youtube.com/user/lipofootoo
Views: 272608 Ian Leahy
CAE Cambridge English Exam - All you need to know
 
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Are you thinking of taking the CAE exam? I'll tell you everything you need to know about the exam to decide if it is for you. Did you know that many people can take the CAE instead of the IELTS? If you have decided to take the CAE, I'll give you details on all the different parts of this Cambridge exam, and also tell you about the 2015 changes. Here are some of the questions that I cover in this video: - What is the exam for? - Who takes the exam? - How hard is the test? - How long is the exam? - What are the different sections of the test? - What are the different test questions like? - How is the test changing? Did you understand the lesson? Take the quiz on it here: http://ww.engvid.com/cambridge-english-exam/ TRANSCRIPT Hello, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is the CAE test. This is a Cambridge exam, and it tests the advanced level of English. So, we're going to generally look at the parts of the test, and then in the next part of the video, we'll look at the test in more detail, so you'll know exactly what to expect if you're going to take this exam. So, who takes this test? This is a test that people choose to take because they want to go to university in an English-speaking country, or you want to do a course in English at a university. You might also be taking this because you need it as part of your visa requirements. Or you might be doing it because you just want to take the test. Not so many people do that, but I've met some. What's in the test? There are five parts at the moment; a reading part, a writing part, a listening part, a speaking part, and also this use of English, which is a vocabulary and grammar combined test that's seeing where you are with that. Importantly, though, in 2015, the reading test and the use of English will be together in one part. So, that means there'll just be four... There'll be four parts 2015 onwards. This... I should also say about this test that it's a Secure English Language Test. That means that you do it in a test center and you have to prove your identity. It's a formal test, and it's one of the reasons why this test is well-respected, and you can use it to enter university and things like that, because the results that you get are trusted. You can do this test on paper or computer; you have a choice. And it tests from... At the lower end, you could be intermediate, and the top end proficiency which is very, very, very, very high. So, that's a broad survey of what's in the test. Now we're going to look at the parts in more detail. So, we have... Let's start with the reading test. The reading test is one hour and 15 minutes. There are four parts. This will be 20% of your overall mark, and you'll be expected to read 3,000 words. What kinds of text will you be reading? Well, you'll be reading newspapers, fiction, non-fiction, and promotional copy. So it could be a variety of texts that you might just encounter in life in an English-speaking country. The skills that it's looking for is... It will be looking for your ability to read for gist, which is like the general meaning, but also detail. These are different reading skills. When you're reading for detail, you'll have to find a specific part of the text and read very closely for your answer, whereas gist relates to the general meaning. And when you're answering the questions, sometimes it will be multiple choice. So, you know, A), B), C), and sometimes you'll need to fill in a gap. So, you need to go back to the test... To the text, read closely, and find your answer so you can fill in the gap. It's also testing you on your ability to interpret tone in a text. So, perhaps not just the literal words written there on the page, but when we understand tone, we get an extra sense of what it really means. And also opinion, so you're reading something, and then you're making... When you're reading it for opinion, you get a sense of what is actually meant, and you'll need to express what is meant through opinion, through people's opinion. And you'll be expected to understand the main ideas of the text as well. When we come back, we're going to look at the other parts of the test in closer detail. Let's have a look at the writing part of the exam in closer detail-this is a magnifying glass-and the use of English part of the exam. So, the writing part of the test is two questions. It's going to be 20% of your overall mark. And it's one hour, 30 minutes. Now, what you need to do in the writing test is... Question one is compulsory, that means you have to answer it; you don't have a choice. In this question, first of all, you need to read an extract, so there'll be a short text, up to 150 words, that you need to read before you write your own answer.
TOEFL Writing – Task 1
 
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Need to get a high score on your TOEFL test? Confused about the Integrated Writing assignment? I'll give you my tips and strategies to succeed in this section of the TOEFL iBT. I will first explain the structure of this writing task. You will then learn how to approach the reading and listening sections, how to take notes, and finally, how to write a summary that will get you a high score. Practice this method as much as you can before writing your TOEFL exam and you WILL succeed. Take the quiz to make sure you understood the lesson: http://www.engvid.com/toefl-writing-task-1/ More TOEFL tips and practice: http://www.goodlucktoefl.com/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is for those of you who will be taking the TOEFL test. And, as usual, when I do a lesson about the English tests, I will speak at a more natural pace, a little bit faster than usual. If you're a beginner, don't worry, you can still listen and still practice your listening skills, and get some vocabulary from the lesson. But it will be a little bit faster, perhaps a little bit more difficult. Let's begin. So, we're looking at the TOEFL task 1, the writing section. This is the integrated task. I'll put it this way. Now, what does that mean by "integrated"? It means they're giving you... Giving you a reading section, they're giving you a listening section, and they're wanting you to write. So you're practicing three skills in one task. Okay? Not easy, but not that difficult if you practice it. So I'm going to give you four tips on how to approach this section of the test. Now, for those of you who have done the practice test, or have taken an actual TOEFL test, or are preparing for one, you know that what will happen is you will be given a reading section-okay?-you will be given three minutes to read it and prepare whatever notes you need, then... This will be on the computer screen. Then it will disappear, then you will hear a lecture that is related somehow to what you read. That will go on for about a minute or two, and then it will stop. Then, you will be given the question. Basically, the question is going to tell you how to relate the listening to the reading. Okay? It is crucial that you take notes, both for the reading and the listening. You can't try to keep all of this in your head. It will not help you when you... When you have to start writing. You will have 20 minutes to write. You should aim for about 200 words, let's say. That should be enough to convey all of the information that they're asking. What you have to remember is right away, they're... You're going to have to do one of two things. You're either going to have to counter. You have to show how the listening, the lecture counters or goes against what was written in the passage, or how the listening supports what was written in the passage. Okay? It's going to be one of those two things. So, as soon as the listening starts, you have to understand right away: Are you going to be countering? Are you going to be supporting? You don't need to wait for the question. It should be very obvious to you, as soon as the lecturer starts to give the lecture: What is he doing, or what is she doing? Is she going against the reading, or is she giving support to the reading? Or is she giving information that draws on information from here that they work together? So counter or support, identify it right away, and then you know how to set up your notes. So, here, I showed you a very basic way of taking your notes. Take out with the reading first, obviously, you're going to have three minutes. Skim the reading. What does that mean? It means look through it pretty quickly. Don't read every word; you don't need to. Although the reading disappears from the screen, it does come back. When the listening is finished and they give you your question and the timer starts, the reading comes back. If you need to go back and get some more information, you can do that. It's there. So, of course, that means you have to concentrate very hard on the listening. You only hear it once, it doesn't come back. If you didn't get any information, you're out of luck. So, set up your notes like this. Put your reading here. Make sure you get your first point with the example, your second point with the example, your third point with the example. Okay? Once this is set up, the listening becomes easier, because now you're just going to be matching points. So this point, what was said for that point? What was said for this point is going to be said here. What was said for this point is going to be said here. Usually, there will be no more than three. Sometimes it'll just be two. Rarely will you have four, but usually three is the right number. So, look for three points here with their examples, look for... Listen for the three points here that basically correspond.
TOEFL: MUST WATCH Before You Start Preparing!
 
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Get an estimate of your TOEFL score: https://goo.gl/4bJEse Teacher who helped me with my speaking part: https://goo.gl/EmHjEK Practice tests that you can use when preparing for TOEFL: http://amzn.to/1NW5zMr Official TOEFL book (from ETS - company that runs TOEFL) - http://amzn.to/1NW5Ej9 See how I scored 117 out of 120 on TOEFL: part 1: Reading and Listening - https://goo.gl/O4gmio part 2: Speaking and Writing - https://goo.gl/LRfIV0 There are a couple of things that you have to do before starting your TOEFL preparation. The most important thing is to understand how much you need to score. Having an exact number will make your preparation process more targeted. It is also important that you don't rush and buy all the TOEFL books available. Two books are enough, I will give you advice on the books I've used to help me score 117 out of 120 on TOEFL exam. Let me know if you liked this video! Subscribe to my channel for more videos about travelling, learning language, education abroad and lifestyle! Instagram - @linguamarina My business - http://goo.gl/RSWy4p Filmed on Canon G7X -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "HOW I LEARN ENGLISH BY WATCHING TV SHOWS - vocabulary, topics" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uSHsac_-gI -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 458392 linguamarina
FCE Speaking Exam Part One - Cambridge FCE Speaking Test Advice
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about how to do the Cambridge FCE speaking exam, part 1. Even if you have a good level of English, the FCE speaking test can be challenging. In this lesson, you can see what to expect in part one of the speaking test and how to improve your score. You can see the full version of this free English lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/fce-speaking-exam-part-one. In this lesson, you will learn: - What to expect in part one of the FCE speaking exam. - How to improve your score in the FCE speaking test. - How to appear more confident. You’ll see what kind of questions you’ll be asked, how you can answer them well, and also some useful advice on how to feel more confident during your exam. You will also see sample FCE speaking questions and answers, so you can see the advice in action! See more of our free English lessons on this page: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons
Views: 272715 Oxford Online English
10 Tips to Improve Your Reading Comprehension
 
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10 Tips to Improve Your Reading Comprehension 1. "Never read a book without a pen in your hand." ~ Benjamin Franklin - That's great advice whether you write in your books or take notes in a notebook. Personally, I write, scribble, highlight, argue and draw symbols in all my books. 2. Read a whole paragraph / section BEFORE you stop to highlight or take a note. Don't stop right when you see something interesting; keep reading to get the "big picture" or context of what stood out to you. Then "reread" when you make your notes. 3. Read important sections out loud. A person reads much slower when you read out loud than when you read silently, but studies show that if you read out loud, you tend to retain things better because you're engaging multiple senses (hearing and seeing). 4. Read silently with quick "check-marks." There are times when you should read silently and simply use a pencil to "check" sections in the margins you want to go back and reread later. This will help you get through a book quicker without being distracted by stopping to highlight or write. 5. Explain what you read. When you finish a chapter / section of a book, take a break and "think" about what you've read and, in your mind, "explain it" to someone. See if you can structure your thoughts so as to be able to repeat back to someone what you've read. This is a great exercise. I do this A LOT when I read - and actually "talk through it" out loud to myself walking around my office or in the car. 6. Learn to "X-ray" a book by reviewing the Table of Contents and only reading the sections / chapters that will be benefit you. And don't feel like you have to read an entire book. 7. Pay attention to summary words - "therefore" or "as a result" or "in conclusion." When you see a summary / conclusion word, make sure you understand the author's points and argument that has led to his conclusion. 8. Circle / Underline key words in a sentence. 9. Mark words you don't know - and look them up! If you have a Kindle this is much easier. Looking up words you don't know increases your understanding of the author's intent, but it also increases your vocabulary! 10. You should read How to Read a Book by Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren. This is a "must read" book! You can get a great price on it at Amazon or WTSBooks.com.
Views: 832878 40SomethingStyle
William Ackman: Everything You Need to Know About Finance and Investing in Under an Hour
 
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William Ackman: Everything You Need to Know About Finance and Investing in Under an Hour. WILLIAM ACKMAN, Activist Investor and Hedge-Fund Manager We all want to be financially stable and enjoy a well-funded retirement, and we don't want to throw out our hard earned money on poor investments. But most of us don't know the first thing about finance and investing. Acclaimed value investor William Ackman teaches you what it takes to finance and grow a successful business and how to make sound investments that will get you to a cash-comfy retirement. The Floating University Originally released September 2011. Additional Lectures: Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk Joel Cohen: An Introduction to Demography (Malthus Miffed: Are People the Problem?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vr44C_G0-o Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-B_ONJIEcE Leon Botstein: Art Now (Aesthetics Across Music, Painting, Architecture, Movies, and More.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6F-sHhmfrY Tamar Gendler: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Politics and Economics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mm8asJxdcds Nicholas Christakis: The Sociological Science Behind Social Networks and Social Influence http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wadBvDPeE4E Paul Bloom: The Psychology of Everything: What Compassion, Racism, and Sex tell us about Human Nature http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=328wX2x_s5g Saul Levmore: Monopolies as an Introduction to Economics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FK2qHyF-8u8 Lawrence Summers: Decoding the DNA of Education in Search of Actual Knowledge http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6SY6N1iMcU Douglas Melton: Is Biomedical Research Really Close to Curing Anything? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y95hT-koAC8
Views: 3256399 Big Think
IELTS Speaking Band 7 Chinese Candidate FULL
 
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IELTS speaking interview example high score by www.gieltshelp.com. This video is an IELTS speaking section interview with a native Mandarin speaker example 2. This playlist teaches important strategies for IELTS speaking interview. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GeneralIeltsHelp. This video is a part in a series that instructs the steps necessary to achieve a high score, between 7 to 9, on the IELTS question. The series includes four example speaking interviews with a native Arabic and Chinese speakers. This series will teach you the skills that will help you to be successful, confident and to reach success on these questions during the speaking interview. Follow the instructions carefully and make sure to practice. Use the subtitles as necessary to help you comprehend the information. It is important to practice a lot to give full sentence answers which reflect the grammar structure of the questions. Strategies will help with fluent language, natural language and complex language. Enjoy. Follow us now on twitter @gielts
Views: 175138 GeneralIELTSHelp
The Perfect Defense: The Oral Defense of a Dissertation
 
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http://www.tamu.edu Dr. Valerie Balester of Texas A&M University talks about how to prepare and what to expect when defending your dissertation.
Views: 630912 Texas A&M University
Ideas for using flashcards
 
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Flashcards are an incredibly useful and flexible resource for teaching vocabulary. Carol Read shows some very simple, practical activities that you can use at Primary.
Views: 1056329 Macmillan Spain