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A Poison Tree by William Blake - Line by line Explanation
 
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This video gives one the detailed line by line analysis of William Blake's famous poem A Poison Tree. Do like And Subscribe my channel for more videos. Feel free to comment if you want complete explanation of any poem or prose. Feel free to suggest. Thank You :)
Views: 41784 English At Fingertips
A Poison Tree Analysis
 
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yt:stretch=4:3
Views: 21149 Carrie Kroner
A Poison Tree - Hindi - William Blake - line to line clear explanation
 
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🌸This poem main theme is of a feeling of rage and jealousy a person kept for his enemy and what outcome it bought in the end listen in video. 🌸About William Blake biography mentioned in the poem The Little black boy : https://youtu.be/3W0tc1FerqI 🌸For any suggestion drop a mail at : [email protected] I didn't know YouTube filter is this bad 😕 🌸 Link to my channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVoa09RTW4zIwBSC_cdY4iQ 🌸 Subscribe and hit the bell icon 🔔to not to miss any new video ♥ OTHER TRANSLATIONS 💚 🌸MEDEA - revenge of an egotistic woman - HINDI - https://youtu.be/RzS5D8GZlDg 🌸CANDIDA - A love triangle tale - HINDI : https://youtu.be/e-YM5Ob7xrY 🌸 AGAMEMNON - the selfish king who killed his daughter - HINDI : https://youtu.be/6TNGWspXhgA 🌸GLASS MENAGERIE - a crippled girl's tale - HINDI : https://youtu.be/HGClRK8k1ko 🌸THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO- revenge of a jealous friend - HINDI : https://youtu.be/-0ZAzRrUu1o William Blake poem A poison tree in Hindi William Blake poem in Hindi William Blake poem in Urdu William Blake song of experience William Blake song of innocence William Blake poems William Blake ki poem ki summary Hindi / Urdu mein 🌸It is in the syllabus of MA English , English honors ,T.G.T , P.G.T , LT grade , C.B.S.E , I.C.S.E , I.C.S and many more..
'A Poison Tree' by William Blake - Analysis for Edexcel Eng Lit GCSE Conflict Anthology
 
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Summary of Key Points Context Blake was a C18th artist as well as poet and he combined these talents to publish 'illuminated books'. Song of Innocence and Songs of Experience are his two best known collections with 'A Poison Tree' published in the latter. This work presents people as cynical and exploitative, especially of children. An early Romantic, Blake was interested in social justice and against the negative effects of the industrial revolution. He despised the Church of England, with its unnatural demands, but revered the Bible and his writing is heavily influenced by this. We see this in 'A Poison Tree'. Structure The poem is written in four quatrains of rhyming couplets. The line are end stopped which foregrounds the rhyme. This combined with a strong rhythm give the poem the quality of a child's song or nursery rhyme. Much of Blake's early work expresses dark, challenging ideas in this simple way. There are two alternating rhyme schemes within the poem - perhaps suggesting the two sides of the conflict it explores. Lines of trochaic trimeter alternate with longer lines of iambic tetrameter. The sequence of ideas is straightforward: the speaker represses the anger he feels for his foe and it subsequently grows. This is expressed through the metaphor of the poison tree which bears fruit. The speaker's foe eats this 'apple bright' and dies. He's found stretched out beneath the poison tree. Point of View First person narrative - the speaker is sharing his experience for our benefit. There are lessons to be learned - although we must infer them. Imagery 1st quatrain - by repressing anger, 'wrath', it grows inside the speaker. When it was expressed, on the other hand, it dissipated. So there is nothing wrong with anger - only how it is managed. The simple sentences and punctuation seem to reinforce this logic. 2nd stanza - introduces the central metaphor of the poison tree. Not expressing anger is like nurturing a deadly tree. It is 'water'd' and 'suuned' within the heart of the speaker - both day and night, which suggests that this destructive emotion has become an all-consuming passion. 'deceitful wiles' emphasizes the secrecy of the speaker as he harbors his grudge. The hissing sibilance in the stanza adds to its menacing tone. 3rd Stanza - 'both day and night' is repeated. Fed constantly, the poison tree bears fruit - an 'apple bright' symbolizes burning hatred. Blake is here evoking the Book of Genesis. Both the foe and Eve perish by giving in to temptation with death and sin the result. 'And' is repeated, adding to the child-like style of the poem but also creating a relentless pace as the narrative unfolds. The night is presonified - it 'veil'd the pole'. Pole means star, so the night worked to increase the blackness of the scene and the sense of dread. 4th stanza: The final rhyming couplet shifts into the present tense and we are left with the image of the foe stretched out dead- nothing is resolved. The speaker is 'glad' - suggesting his utter corruption as a soul twisted by repressed anger. Themes Anger becomes a destructive emotion when not expressed. It is corrupt and corrupting. 'Smiles' are just a cover - authentic emotion is sacrificed when an obsession takes over. Lies and deceit another theme - the foe steals and the speaker secretly nurtures his anger. 'Wrath' describes God's anger in the Bible. Blake's poem is a kind of parable - we have to infer its symbolism but it is certainly didactic and seems to be teaching us that if we fail to communicate openly and if we lie, only violence and destruction can result.
Views: 38080 Mary Meredith
Everything you need to know about "A poison tree" by Wiliiam Blake
 
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This video will outline everything you will need to know to achieve perfect marks when analysing A poison Tree by William Blake. This is useful not only for GCSE, but A-Level, Degree level and beyond. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe and then keep revising: register for HUNDREDS of FREE videos covering English, Maths and Science for GCSE and A-Level revision at http://tuitionkit.com
Views: 16483 The English Teacher
GCSE Edexcel Poetry Collection B Poison Tree
 
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Colour coded for language, structure and context.
Views: 680 Miss Briers
Understanding Poetry: (SPM) A Poison Tree
 
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A short video for Malaysian SPM and STPM students on understanding William Blake's A Poison Tree. For more of this, do visit www.guidemyessaymy.com. Background Music: Take Off and Shoot a Zero by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/stuntisland/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/
Views: 1765 Ariv C
William Blake: A Poison Tree Analysis
 
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Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com
Mr. Vetter AP English Lit: Analyzing Poetry and A Poison Tree
 
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Mr. Vetter's AP English Literature. Lecture on what to consider when analyzing a poem. "A Poison Tree" by William Blake used as example (page 475 of Literature book).
Views: 6933 J. Vetter
A Poison Tree, by William Blake
 
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Battling the irreversible deletion of an almost-completed project, near famishment, the infirmity of an antiquated computer, the overwhelming desire to expel said computer from the nearest second story window, extreme sleep deprivation, the daunting task of mastering the utterly perplexing Adobe Flash Professional software, and a demoralizing crunch-time power outage a mere twelve hours prior to the deadline, the duo of Nancy & Brooke managed to compose a fantastic interpretive animation of William Blake's sinister poem, "A Poison Tree." Here's to good grades!
Views: 136470 Nancy McNamara
A Poison Tree Annotations
 
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An in-depth look at the ideas, language, structure and context of A Poison Tree by William Blake Edexcel GCSE English Literature Paper 2 (Conflict Cluster)
Blake: Poison Tree
 
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This video is about Blake: Poison Tree
Views: 935 Anurag Jain
A Poison Tree: Themes
 
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A video done by my Form 5 students in 4 periods (2 hours 20 minutes) to highlight the themes and literary devices of the infamous poem by William Blake. There might be a handful of grammar and spelling errors but do cut these 17-year-olds some slacks.
Views: 1667 Ana Shirin Razi Rabi
A poison tree William Blake - analysis
 
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School project
Views: 62 Nikola Radakovic
A Poison Tree poem short summary
 
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Written by William Blake
Views: 496 SSLC Exam Guide
A Poison Tree - Analysis
 
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This is an analysis of the poem 'A Poison Tree' by William Blake. It is intended to be evaluated by Mr. Stone.
Views: 125 Matthew Schneider
Symbolism in Blake's "A Poison  Tree"
 
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Symbolism in Blakes A Poison Tree Short lecture
Views: 13188 John Stacy
A Poison Tree Annotation
 
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"A Poison Tree" by William Blake Reading record group work IB English 12
Views: 343 Cale Coppage
A Poison Tree by William Blake
 
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A Poison Tree by William Blake Poem for Form 5 with animation for better understanding.
Views: 4536 missZaazzy
A poison tree by William Blake (Poetry)
 
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Project Name: Production of course ware for undergraduate subjects (CEC- English) Project Investigator: Dr. Tilak R Ken Module Name: A poison tree by William Blake (Poetry)
Views: 2115 Vidya-mitra
BA poem A Poison Tree, Lec 1 - BA Part 1 - BA English Book 1 Poem PU
 
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"BA English Poem 12 A Poison Tree" Online lectures for BA English Part 1 by Mr.Shahid Bhatti. IMPORTANT: If you want one to one personalized coaching from Sir Shahid Bhatti, please call us at: 0300-8885650 You can also buy BA English notes from us In this video following sub topics have been taught: - Translation - Explanation For more videos of Shahid Bhatti visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study This online lectures series contains all course of BA Part 1 by renowned English teacher. The lectures are designed to make sure the students gets best understanding and can get highest marks in BA English. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 17374 ilmkidunya
A Poison Tree by William Blake | Line by line meaning in hindi | Hindi summary of poem
 
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A Poison Tree BY WILLIAM BLAKE I was angry with my friend;  I told my wrath, my wrath did end.  I was angry with my foe:  I told it not, my wrath did grow.  And I waterd it in fears,  Night & morning with my tears:  And I sunned it with smiles,  And with soft deceitful wiles.  And it grew both day and night.  Till it bore an apple bright.  And my foe beheld it shine,  And he knew that it was mine.  And into my garden stole,  When the night had veild the pole;  In the morning glad I see;  My foe outstretched beneath the tree. Summary- A Poison Tree BY WILLIAM BLAKE - stanza 1. Poet was angry with his friend, he told him that he was angry with him. And thus his anger died. However when poet was angry with his foe he did not express his displeasure / anger. That's why his anger did not die. Instead it started growing inside him. A Poison Tree BY WILLIAM BLAKE stanza 2- The anger kept growing inside poets head (as he has not expressed it.) This caused him so much pain. He was always in fear. However he learnt to act in front of his enemy. Now whenever his enemy came infornt of poet, poet acted as if it was alright as always. A Poison Tree BY WILLIAM BLAKE stanza 3. The anger kept growing until it bore a result. It might be a positive result achieved out of revenge or negative as well. That is open for debate. And ones poet anger gave birth to the result his enemy knew that this result was achieved by poet. A Poison Tree BY WILLIAM BLAKE stanza 4 One night poets foe stole into poets garden. And next morning when poet Wole up he found tbat he was fast asleep beneath the poison tree he has planted.
Views: 765 after reading
Summary of Blake's Poem "A Poison Tree"
 
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This is the summary of William Blake's poem "A Poison Tree". This poem is sad. It expresses the repressed and traumatic feelings and emotions. It deals with anger with an individual. To our dismay, this anger leads to the murder, the ultimate end of a person, no matter who he is. The poem explores themes of indignation, revenge, and more generally the fallen state of mankind. This summary is in British Accent with English subtitles mainly for the students of English Literature.
Views: 303 Ohidur Chad
The Poison Tree: William Blake. Analysis
 
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Edexcel English GCSE Conflict Poetry: Poison Tree by William Blake
A Poison Tree by William Blake - Poetry Reading
 
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A Poison Tree - A poem by William Blake. About the poet - William Blake (1757- 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. He was born in the Soho district of London. Blake is considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. For more videos log onto http://www.youtube.com/pearlsofwisdom Also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pearlsofwisdomchannel
Views: 18448 Pearls Of Wisdom
A Poison Tree - Short Film
 
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A short film based on the poem by William Blake.
Views: 8022 evgexpress
William Blake "A Poison Tree" Poem animation
 
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Heres a virtual movie of the great William Blake Engraver,Visionary and Poet reading his poem "A Poison Tree" A Poison Tree is a poem written in 1794 by the poet William Blake as a part of his collection of poems, Songs of Experience. Although it is one of Blake's less known poems, it is full of meaning and is sometimes considered to be one of his finest poems. A Poison Tree" In "A Poison Tree," by William Blake the tree is used as an extended metaphor, which helps explain a truth of human nature. This poem teaches how anger can be dispelled by goodwill or nurtured to become a deadly poison.The opening stanza sets up everything for the entire poem, from the ending of anger with the "friend," to the continuing anger with the "foe." In the opening stanza the speaker states, "My wrath did grow." The speaker later describes the living nature of the wrath as one which, "grew both day and night," and, "bore an apple bright." This comparison by metaphor of wrath to a tree illustrates the speaker's idea that, like the slow and steady growth of a tree, anger and wrath gradually accumulate and form something just as mighty and deadly as a poisoned tree. To understand the metaphorical sense of the poem, one must first examine the title, "A Poison Tree," which alerts the reader that some type of metaphor will dominate the poem. In the second stanza, Blake develops the metaphor, by describing the growing and nurturing of a tree; a tree that represents the feeding of hate and vanity explored by the speaker. The speaker goes further to say, "And I sunned it with smiles" describing not only false intentions, but the processing of "sunning", giving nutrients to a plant so that it may not only grow and live, but flourish. The religious context of the poem is also evident in two metaphorical allusions made by the speaker towards the end of the poem. The deadly fruit borne of the tree is an apple, while the scene of death and treachery occurs in the speaker's garden. The apple is a product of hate, the ironic "fruits of one's labor," and a biblical metaphor for sin. The garden, which could be viewed as a place of life and prosperity, is simply the stage for the sinful act, as it was in the Bible. Like the story of Adam and Eve in the Book of Genesis, man gives in to the weakness of sin and falls. Blake's poetry, while easy to understand and simplistic, usually implies a moral motif on an almost basic level. The powerful figurative language in "A Poison Tree" is so apparent that it brings forth an apparent message as well. The poem is not a celebration of wrath; rather it is Blake's cry against it. Through this, Blake warns the reader of the dangers of repression and of rejoicing in the sorrow of our foes. William Blake wrote this poem to convey a simple message. "A Poison Tree" may be one of Blake's simpler poems, but is just as effective of getting its message across. In this simple but powerful poem, William Blake describes how a feeling of anger soon disappears if there is good will and friendship. Kind Regards Jim Clark All rights are reserved on this video recording copyright Jim Clark 2012 A Poison Tree........ I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I waterd it in fears, Night & morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night. Till it bore an apple bright. And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine. And into my garden stole, When the night had veild the pole; In the morning glad I see; My foe outstretchd beneath the tree.
Views: 44651 poetryreincarnations
Analysis of William Blake’s poem “A Poison Tree” I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath
 
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Analysis of William Blake’s “A Poison Tree” Don't confuse the poet with the poem's speaker. Blake has created a character who is “glad” an enemy died. This is close to gallows humor--making light of a subject matter that is generally serious. The poem has the simplicity of a nursery rhyme, but these lines are not fit for children. No reasonable person celebrates death this way. Blake the poet is not saying we should think of ways to kill opponents though the poem’s speaker has no problem with that idea. Blake’s overall purpose is to warn about the danger of repressing anger in early stages. Repressed wrath can lead to unhealthy consequences. We need a healthy catharsis, a productive purging. Since resentment may fester, we are wise to show at least a little anger to an enemy, thereby reducing a yearning for revenge (the poem admits it’s easier to express anger to a friend). It’s a debatable point. I prefer to turn the other cheek or even walk away from trouble. The poem ends with the speaker stumbling upon a dead enemy--a result of anger being hidden--and gloating. No line explicitly says the foe is dead, but “outstretched” can have no other meaning in a poem with “poison” in the title. It’s not a nap. The enemy did not faint. The vindictive speaker would not be “glad” if the foe is merely napping or has fainted. Is the foe’s death (“outstretched”) the narrator's fault? Maybe not--the foe was trespassing “into my garden.” On the other hand, the speaker nurtured a grudge in intense ways--watering the anger (with tears?), sunning the anger. “It” is used several times for wrath. In lines 5, 7, and 9, “it” refers to “wrath” as well as to the poison tree named in the title. The speaker’s anger and the tree are the same. The tree of anger grows enough to produce fruit. Line 10 again uses “it” for the tree (and anger) that produced an apple. In lines 11 and 12, “it” has a new antecedent (“it” refers to the apple). If the apple that was carefully cultivated is too tempting--irresistible!--then we could call this murder. The hidden anger led to a loss of control over events. The tree (of the mind?) seduces the enemy. Does the tree allude to Adam and the Fall of Man in Genesis? Blake was obsessed with the Bible. The poem makes an interesting switch from past to present tense: "glad I see" instead of "glad I saw." Was the poem inspired by the anger of the British towards the American colonies? Or was Blake capturing the British mood towards the recent French Revolution? During these times, people debated if expressing anger is healthy or unhealthy. The rhyme scheme is aabb ccdd eeff gghh. As we hear in the first line, the poem is mostly trochaic: “I was angry with my friend.” Odd-numbered syllables take the emphasis, starting with the poem’s first word (“I”). It’s the same rhythm as “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” and “Mary had a little lamb.” One challenge in vocabulary may be “wiles,” which means tricks or deceptions. “Pole” is used for tree at one point since it rhymes with “stole.” At night the pole or tree is “veiled” or hidden in darkness. Literal darkness echoes the poem’s moral darkness. ____________________________ "A Poison Tree” By William Blake I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I water’d it in fears, Night & morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night. Till it bore an apple bright. And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine. And into my garden stole, When the night had veil'd the pole; In the morning glad I see; My foe outstretched beneath the tree. Analysis of William Blake’s poem “A Poison Tree” I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath
Views: 630 Tim Gracyk
A Poison Tree by William Blake - a presentation for the GCSE English Literature anthology
 
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-This presentation explains the brilliant Blake A Poison Tree poem. Blake was visionary and was practising mindfulness centuries before it became a thing! . He could see outside the confines of religion and the matrix of society - and he wrote and drew abut it. For this he was an outcast during his time on earth but he still read and loved today.This is a piece by a student made for his one to one class with Ms Snow The poem is to be found in the Edexcel anthology for GCSE and many other anthologies. It is about anger growing if it is watered and causing death in the end. It is in the form of a nursery rhyme but the meaning is deceptively complex..Google his pictures they are amazing
Views: 1665 ActionmediaUK
A Poison Tree By William Blake (Poem)
 
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A poison tree is a poem by English Poet, William Blake. Published in 1794 as part of his Songs of Experience collection. Music - Angels_Dream Pics And video used - https://pixabay.com/ https://www.pexels.com/ https://videos.pexels.com/ https://www.videvo.net/
Views: 92 Mindstream City
the poison tree poem
 
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the poison tree is one of the best and most famous poem in BA English poetry section
Views: 722 BA English Videos
Analysis of William Blake’s poem “A Poison Tree” I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath
 
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Analysis of William Blake’s “A Poison Tree” Don't confuse the poet with the poem's speaker. Blake has created a character who is “glad” an enemy died. This is close to gallows humor--making light of a subject matter that is generally serious. The poem has the simplicity of a nursery rhyme, but these lines are not fit for children. No reasonable person celebrates death this way. Blake the poet is not saying we should think of ways to kill opponents though the poem’s speaker has no problem with that idea. Blake’s overall purpose is to warn about the danger of repressing anger in early stages. Repressed wrath can lead to unhealthy consequences. We need a healthy catharsis, a productive purging. Since resentment may fester, we are wise to show at least a little anger to an enemy, thereby reducing a yearning for revenge (the poem admits it’s easier to express anger to a friend). It’s a debatable point. I prefer to turn the other cheek or even walk away from trouble. The poem ends with the speaker stumbling upon a dead enemy--a result of anger being hidden--and gloating. No line explicitly says the foe is dead, but “outstretched” can have no other meaning in a poem with “poison” in the title. It’s not a nap. The enemy did not faint. The vindictive speaker would not be “glad” if the foe is merely napping or has fainted. Is the foe’s death (“outstretched”) the narrator's fault? Maybe not--the foe was trespassing “into my garden.” On the other hand, the speaker nurtured a grudge in intense ways--watering the anger (with tears?), sunning the anger. “It” is used several times for wrath. In lines 5, 7, and 9, “it” refers to “wrath” as well as to the poison tree named in the title. The speaker’s anger and the tree are the same. The tree of anger grows enough to produce fruit. Line 10 again uses “it” for the tree (and anger) that produced an apple. In lines 11 and 12, “it” has a new antecedent (“it” refers to the apple). If the apple that was carefully cultivated is too tempting--irresistible!--then we could call this murder. The hidden anger led to a loss of control over events. The tree (of the mind?) seduces the enemy. Does the tree allude to Adam and the Fall of Man in Genesis? Blake was obsessed with the Bible. The poem makes an interesting switch from past to present tense: "glad I see" instead of "glad I saw." Was the poem inspired by the anger of the British towards the American colonies? Or was Blake capturing the British mood towards the recent French Revolution? During these times, people debated if expressing anger is healthy or unhealthy. The rhyme scheme is aabb ccdd eeff gghh. As we hear in the first line, the poem is mostly trochaic: “I was angry with my friend.” Odd-numbered syllables take the emphasis, starting with the poem’s first word (“I”). It’s the same rhythm as “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” and “Mary had a little lamb.” One challenge in vocabulary may be “wiles,” which means tricks or deceptions. “Pole” is used for tree at one point since it rhymes with “stole.” At night the pole or tree is “veiled” or hidden in darkness. Literal darkness echoes the poem’s moral darkness. ____________________________ "A Poison Tree” By William Blake I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I water’d it in fears, Night & morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night. Till it bore an apple bright. And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine. And into my garden stole, When the night had veil'd the pole; In the morning glad I see; My foe outstretched beneath the tree. Analysis of William Blake’s poem “A Poison Tree” I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath
Views: 44 Tim Gracyk
"A Poison Tree" William Blake (British accent)
 
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http://www.norwichenglish.co.uk Read in a southern British accent. Audio © 2012 Martin Harris Image © The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge (used with permission) --------------------------------------------------- A Poison Tree by William Blake (1757-1827) I was angry with my friend: I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe; I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I water'd it in fears, Night & morning with my tears; And I sunned it with my smiles And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night, Till it bore an apple bright; And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine, And into my garden stole When the night had veil'd the pole: In the morning glad I see My foe outstretch'd beneath the tree ---------------Vocabulary-------------------------- wrath (n) - great anger; fury often marked by a desire for vengeance deceitful (a) -- full of (misleading) lies deceit (n) deception (n) - a strategem; a trick; a lie deceive (v) - to cause to believe what is not true; mislead. *wiles (npl) - tricks or to get someone to do something; - trickery intended to persuade somebody to do something, especially in the form of insincere charm or flattery wily (adj) -- full of wiles; cunning, crafty *bear (bore borne) (v) -- to carry; to give birth to. Often used in the phrase: to bear sth. in mind (=to consider sth.) it must be borne in mind that... the consequences must be borne in mind. *behold (beheld beheld) (v)- to perceive; notice foe (n) -- enemy *steal (stole stolen) (v) sneak: to move quietly, especially in the hope of not been seen or caught (the more common meaning is to take something without permission) veil (v) to cover/hide veil (n) to cover/hide the pole -- the north star *uncommon or poetical word ------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 89682 Martin Harris
The Poem Poison Tree by Blake  in Hindi Urdu by Lecturer Mk Bhutta BA English PU UOS
 
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The Poem Poison Tree by Blake in Hindi Urdu by Lecturer Mk Bhutta BA English PU UOS via http://playit.pk
Views: 3519 Bhutta Academe
A Poison Tree (William Blake) - Poetry Reading
 
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Dalton reads a poem for your enemies written by the great William Blake in 1784. Help Us Continue to Create Great Content: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/strippedcoverlit Merch: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=Stripped+Cover+Lit LOVELY PATRONS/ WHO TO BLAME Claude Thompson // Curtis Thompson // Zoila Carrizales// Devin Lee // Ævar Rafn Halldórsson // Marie Berg // Amy Gofton // Silje Helgerud // PF // Peter Clark// Elizabeth Tyree // Patricia Greenway //Miriam Frei // Amanda Appel // Nhi Le // Samantha Knyvett // Austin K. Wohlwend // Erika Centeno // Angela Gray // Tim Stinson // Danielle Waggett // Monse Zarzosa // Stephanie Riedel // Jordie Leilani // Samantha Bledsoe // Josh Caporale // CharloReads // Yumi Yuiyama // James Freese // Jen Campbell// Noura Ghannam // Grace Donoghue // Missy Balthrop // Sophie Prewett // Jo Faisman // Sophie Tullett // Tansy Jean // Katie Kump // Taryn Lowery // Andrea Garcia // Colleen Miller // Alixandra Johnson // Aysha Taryam // Tanja Eisenberg // Amber Leahey // James Chatham // Alex Sandoni // Aaron Analla // Court Aniol // Maggie Dobschuetz // Brittany Stallman // Bryce Gassner // Lauren McCormick // Meike S. // Cheyenne Miller // Lesley Macgregor // Judith Smet // LHW // Frannie // Autumn Magro // Mark Jackson // Michaelis// Howard McEwan// Gail Doughty// but especially Richard Bruna // Heather Snow// Kristen Pesta// Emily Hann// Joni Lucido// James, Just James// Ben Redmond// Dennis Poretsky// Brennon Hargrave// Jenifer Boyd// L// Justin Fullerton// Navi Sahota // Laura Dominik // Kristen Taylor// Michael McGrath Patreon Levels $1 You like me. $1 or more per month Appreciate the arts and support our project. You will be listed in our descriptions as a patron and I will make a poetry review for a poem of your choice for every calendar year you remain a patron. $2 You really like me. $2 or more per month You're in the description drop down, and I do my little dance in your name. But not on camera, I have to keep some semblance of dignity. $5 You've arrived. $5 or more per month You're listed as a patron in the description and you are immortalized forever on the Stripped Cover Lit set with an action figure of my noble discretion. $10 You love me. $10 or more per month Hubba hubba. You're listed as a patron. You've got action figure representation on set. And you're a supreme leader in the after life. $20+ You really love me. $20 or more per month Boom, you're listed in the description. Pow, you're an action figure on set. Pew Pew, you're a supreme leader in the world to come. Also? I am automatically wary of your motivations. But I could always undo one more button...
Views: 217 Stripped Cover Lit
A POISON TREE by Wiliam Blake
 
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Digital Story of A Poison Tree For educational use - it is a requirement for completing the Literary Text (Blended) course
Views: 12495 Nadiah Abdah
Song of the Poet - A Poison Tree by William Blake
 
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Musically interpreted by Konarak Reddy and recited by Kirtana Kumar.
Views: 1470 PhantomSquare
Klaus reading William Blake's poem "A Poison Tree"
 
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OTROVNO STABLO - Vilijem Blejk Na svog druga Ijut beh, smesta Bes iskalih - Ijutnje nesta. Na dušmana Ijut beh, reći Ne hteh to - gnev posta veći. Zalivah ga ja u zloći Suzom danju i po noći I sunčah na smehu svom, Mameći ga mišlju zlom. Jabuku on u svom granju Rodi, rastuć' noću, danju; Dušman vide gde sred hvoja Blista, znajuć' da je moja Drznu mi se u vrt doći, Ušunja se usred noći: Ujutro ga u dan sveži Videh gde pod stablom leži.
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A Poison Tree William Blake
 
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English Language And Literature
Views: 23809 Arts & Humanities
A Poison Tree by William Blake (animation: Maya.T.)
 
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animation: Maya.T. reading by Toby Kebbell music: Luke Howard -- Pan
Views: 49769 mayaangst
A poison tree in hindi by william blake ( Gulmohar 8)
 
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Hello friends! In this video you will watch the line by line Hindi Explanation of the poem "A Poison Tree " which has been composed by an eminent poet ' William Blake '.
A Poison Tree - Short Film
 
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A short film based on the poem by William Blake. Hoped you guys enjoyed watching my project... giving this video a thumbs up with your favourite thumb.
Views: 3299 faiz yusri
"A Poison Tree" William Blake poem (I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end)
 
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Analysis of William Blake’s “A Poison Tree” Don't confuse the poet with the poem's speaker. Blake has created a character who is “glad” an enemy died. This is close to gallows humor--making light of a subject matter that is generally serious. The poem has the simplicity of a nursery rhyme, but these lines are not fit for children. No reasonable person celebrates death this way. Blake the poet is not saying we should think of ways to kill opponents though the poem’s speaker has no problem with that idea. Blake’s overall purpose is to warn about the danger of repressing anger in early stages. Repressed wrath can lead to unhealthy consequences. We need a healthy catharsis, a productive purging. Since resentment may fester, we are wise to show at least a little anger to an enemy, thereby reducing a yearning for revenge (the poem admits it’s easier to express anger to a friend). It’s a debatable point. I prefer to turn the other cheek or even walk away from trouble. The poem ends with the speaker stumbling upon a dead enemy--a result of anger being hidden--and gloating. No line explicitly says the foe is dead, but “outstretched” can have no other meaning in a poem with “poison” in the title. It’s not a nap. The enemy did not faint. The vindictive speaker would not be “glad” if the foe is merely napping or has fainted. Is the foe’s death (“outstretched”) the narrator's fault? Maybe not--the foe was trespassing “into my garden.” On the other hand, the speaker nurtured a grudge in intense ways--watering the anger (with tears?), sunning the anger. “It” is used several times for wrath. In lines 5, 7, and 9, “it” refers to “wrath” as well as to the poison tree named in the title. The speaker’s anger and the tree are the same. The tree of anger grows enough to produce fruit. Line 10 again uses “it” for the tree (and anger) that produced an apple. In lines 11 and 12, “it” has a new antecedent (“it” refers to the apple). If the apple that was carefully cultivated is too tempting--irresistible!--then we could call this murder. The hidden anger led to a loss of control over events. The tree (of the mind?) seduces the enemy. Does the tree allude to Adam and the Fall of Man in Genesis? Blake was obsessed with the Bible. The poem makes an interesting switch from past to present tense: "glad I see" instead of "glad I saw." Was the poem inspired by the anger of the British towards the American colonies? Or was Blake capturing the British mood towards the recent French Revolution? During these times, people debated if expressing anger is healthy or unhealthy. The rhyme scheme is aabb ccdd eeff gghh. As we hear in the first line, the poem is mostly trochaic: “I was angry with my friend.” Odd-numbered syllables take the emphasis, starting with the poem’s first word (“I”). It’s the same rhythm as “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” and “Mary had a little lamb.” One challenge in vocabulary may be “wiles,” which means tricks or deceptions. “Pole” is used for tree at one point since it rhymes with “stole.” At night the pole or tree is “veiled” or hidden in darkness. Literal darkness echoes the poem’s moral darkness. ____________________________ "A Poison Tree” By William Blake I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I water’d it in fears, Night & morning with my tears: And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night. Till it bore an apple bright. And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine. And into my garden stole, When the night had veil'd the pole; In the morning glad I see; My foe outstretched beneath the tree. "A Poison Tree" William Blake poem (I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end)
Views: 2343 Tim Gracyk
A Poison Tree
 
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English 9 Honor Project A Poison Tree by William Blake made by: Kyleigh Baker Imaan Chaguley Emilia Howe Laphat Leerasetthakorn
Views: 6921 Pin LaPat