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Grammar - Sentence Analysis
 
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5th graders analyze a complex sentence. In the first layer students identify parts of speech. In the second layer students identify subject and predicate. In the third layer students identify any phrases. In the fourth layer students identify the sentence type and the sentence structure.
Views: 31902 Mary Beth Steven
Sentence Analysis: Syntax & Grammar | Educational Videos for Kids
 
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Learn to analyze sentences with quick and easy examples! SUBSCRIBE ▶ http://bit.ly/Creators365Sub Prayers are unimembres when it is not possible to separate subject and predicate bimembres , when they have two terms. On the subject, the core is a noun and the predicate, a verb. If the subject has more than one core, it is a compound subject, if you have one, the subject is simple. If the predicate has more of a verbal nucleus is compound verbal predicate and, if you have only one, it's simple verbal predicate. WATCH MORE ▶ http://bit.ly/Creators365 FOLLOW US: Facebook ▶ http://facebook.com/Aula365 Twitter ▶ http://twitter.com/aula365 Instagram ▶ http://instagram.com/aula365 ----------------------------------------------------- Welcome to Creators365, where emotion is learning to create. Here you will find the most important content for school subjects: Math, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences and Language. Find us at: https://www.aula365.com The funniest learning social network in the world!
Views: 3198 Creators
Learn English Grammar: The Sentence
 
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http://www.engvid.com Do you know how to build a sentence in English? In this lesson, you will learn the basic parts of a simple sentence, or independent clause. Knowing this will make it easier to understand any sentence in written English. Understanding how these different parts of a sentence work together to form meaning will help you write better in English. The knowledge in this lesson is essential for any 'Independent User' or 'Proficient User' of English. Quiz yourself here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-sentence/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again. I'm Adam. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. Today I have a very important lesson, I think, for all of you that will help you very much with your reading, but especially your writing skills. Okay? Today we're going to look at the sentence. What is a sentence? Now, I know that all of you are saying: "Well, we know what a sentence is. We've learned this a thousand times before." Right? I know what you've learned and I know what you haven't learned, many of you; some of you have, of course. The sentence has a very basic structure, there's a very basic component that must be involved or included in a sentence, and a lot of grammar teachers, a lot of English teachers don't teach this. Okay? All of you, I'm sure have by now heard of "SVO", but have you heard of "SVsC"? Have you heard of "SVC"? Maybe yes, maybe no. But I'm sure a lot of you are going: "What? I've never heard of these things before." Well, we're going to talk about this in one second. Before we talk about a sentence, we have to talk about a clause. Now, what is a clause? I'm sure you've heard this word before as well, but just in case, a clause is any subject, verb combination. It's a group of words that must include a subject and a verb. Now, also very important to remember: it must be a tense verb, meaning that it must take a time; past, present, future. Okay? No base verb, no infinitive verb. So that is a clause. Now, there are two types of clauses. Okay? We have independent clauses and we have dependent clauses. The... These are sometimes called subordinate clauses. Now, every sentence in English to be a grammatically correct sentence must have an independent clause. It doesn't need a dependent clause, but it could have one. The independent clause could include a dependent clause as the subject or object. We'll talk about that after. So an independent clause has a subject and a verb, and it can stand by itself. It can contain a complete idea by itself. Okay? So, technically, the shortest sentence you can have in English will be a... Will be an independent clause with a subject and verb. What is the absolute shortest sentence that you can think of? Think of a sentence, the shortest you can possibly make it. Okay? Here's an example: "Go!" Is this a complete English sentence? Yes. Why? Because it contains an independent clause. Where? We have the implied subject: "you" and the tense verb: "go", the imperative tense "go". So this your basic English sentence. Now, we have three other types, three basic types and we can of course play with these after. Subject, verb, object. Some independent clauses must have an object, we'll talk about that in a second. Excuse me. Subject, verb, subject complement. Some sentences must have a subject complement. Subject, verb, complement. Okay? We're going to talk about each of these in a moment. I have the "A" here because quite often, this complement is actually an adverb phrase or an adverbial. We'll talk about that in a second. So your basic sentence can be any one of these three. Now, the reason we're looking at this... All these structures is because once you understand what must be contained in a sentence, then you can read any English sentence out there that is grammatically correct and be able to understand the main idea of that sentence. Okay? So let's start with "SVO". Okay, let's look at our "SVO" type of independent clause: subject, verb, object. Now, first, what is an object? Well, we have two types of objects to talk about. We have the direct object, we have the indirect object. Now, the thing to understand is that the object always answers a question about the verb, it completes the meaning of the verb by asking the questions: "What?" or: "Who?" Now, keep in mind that technically, it's: "Whom?" But if you say: "Who?" I'll let it go this time. Okay? Formal academic writing, "Whom?", "Whom?", "Whom?" IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all that - "Whom?" not: "Who?" In the object position. But the direct object answers: "What?" or: "Who?" about the verb. Okay? We'll get back to that.
All parts of sentence (Analysis) | By Sumit Sir | Uphaar Classes
 
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Our Telegram Group https://t.me/uphaar Our Facebook like page https://m.facebook.com/upharclasses Hello friends, We work on- 1. 9th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 2. 10th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 3. 11th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 4. 12h - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 5. SSC, Bank, Airforce, Nevy, TGT, PGT TET CTET etc 6. Motivational Videos 7. Yoga 8. Meditation (ध्यान) 8. Spiritual (अध्यात्म) 9. Smartphone techniques (Hidden features) 10. Adobe Photoshop 11. Corel Draw. 12. Computer techniques etc
Views: 1234 Uphaar Classes
Sentence Analysis Exercise
 
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In English 8, students review the basic parts of a sentence, subject and predicate, and analyze their own sentences for these parts. This discussion led to work on the sentence analysis sheet.
Views: 14603 Alexander Clarkson
What is a sentence? | Syntax | Khan Academy
 
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A sentence is a grammatically complete idea. All sentences have a noun or pronoun component called the subject, and a verb part called the predicate. David and Paige explore this division across several different example sentences. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar/syntax/v/three-types-of-sentence-syntax-khan-academy Syntax on Khan Academy: Syntax is the ordering of language; it’s the study of how sentences work. In this section, we’ll scratch the surface of syntax as it applies to English grammar. Much more can be said about this subject, but we’ll save that for KA Linguistics. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to KhanAcademy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 141542 Khan Academy
Data Analysis - Sentence Meaning #1
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the meaning of three selected sentences: First, in terms of their propositions and secondly, by converting the propositions into their predications. Exercise #1 involves simple propositions only.
The 4 English Sentence Types – simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
 
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Did you know there are only four sentence types in English? To improve your writing and reading skills in English, I'll teach you all about simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences in this grammar video. You'll learn how to identify the independent and dependent clauses. Don't worry, it's easier than it sounds! By learning to identify and use these sentence structures, you'll make your writing more interesting and dynamic. I'll also share many example sentences in the lesson, so you can practice with my help. http://www.engvid.com/the-4-english-sentence-types-simple-compound-complex-compound-complex/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is a writing lesson, but it's also a spoken English lesson. It's about anything to do with English, because we're going to be looking at sentence types. Now, of course, when you speak, you're using all kinds of sentence types. But, especially in writing, it's important to know the different types of sentences, because, especially if you're going to be writing tests, they want to see sentence variety. And even if you're not writing tests, anything you write, if you're using only one type of sentence, your writing becomes very bland, very boring, very hard to follow, because it's a little bit monotone. So what you need to do is you need to vary... You need a variety of sentence structures in your writing to give it a little bit more life. Okay? Luckily, you only need to know four sentence types. We have simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound-complex. Now, this is not exactly easy, but it's not exactly hard, either. If you figure out what you need to have in each one, in each sentence type, just make sure it's there. Okay? Let's start. A simple sentence has one independent clause. A little bit of review: What is an independent clause? An independent clause has a subject and a verb, and can complete an idea. It can stand by itself, because the idea in that clause is complete. I don't need to add anything else to it. Okay. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses, joined by a conjunction. A compound conjunction: "and", "but", "or", "so", "for" (not very common), etc. So, we join two independent clauses with a compound conjunction. You can have more, but again, you have to be a little bit careful. Once you get to three, start to look for a way to finish your sentence, because if you get to the fourth, you already have a crazy sentence that has the... Runs the risk of being a run-on sentence. Eventually, you're going to make a mistake, you're going to miss something, and the whole sentence falls apart. I don't recommend three, but you can put three. Then we have a complex sentence. A complex sentence has one independent clause, plus one or more dependent clause. A dependent clause is a clause that has a subject and a verb, but cannot stand by itself. It is not a complete idea. It has some sort of relationship to the independent clause. We have three types of dependent clauses. We have noun clauses, we have adjective clauses, and we have adverb clauses. Okay? That's a whole separate lesson. You can look at that later. But you have to have one of these, plus one of these, and you have a complex sentence. Next we have a compound-complex sentence. Here you have two or more independent clauses, again, joined by a conjunction, and one or more dependent clause. Okay? So you have basically all the elements in this sentence. Then, once you have all this stuff, you can add as many complements, or basically extras, as you want. So, let's look at an example. We're going to start with the simple sentence: "Layla studied biology." Very simple. I have a subject, I have a verb, I have an object. Okay? This is a simple sentence. It's an independent clause; it can stand by itself as a complete idea. Now, I can add anything I want to this that is not another clause of any type, and it'll still be a simple sentence. So I can say: "My friend Layla studied biology in university." I'll just say "uni" for short. I have more information, but do I have a different type of sentence? No. It's still a simple sentence. Now, let's look at this sentence. First, let me read it to you: "Even with the weather being that nasty, the couple and their families decided to go ahead with the wedding as planned." Now you're thinking: "Wow, that's got to be a complex sentence", right? "It's so long. There's so much information in it." But, if we look at it carefully, it is still a simple sentence. Why? Because we only have one independent clause. Where is it? Well, find the subject and verb combination first. So, what is the subject in this sentence? I'll give you a few seconds, figure it out. Hit the pause key, look at it. Okay, we're back. Here is the subject: "the couple and their families". Now, don't get confused with this "and".
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 269916 Oxford Online English
Basic Sentence Structure
 
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Basic Sentence Structure
Views: 1852585 englishfuntime
Subject Verb Agreement  |  English Lesson  |  Common Grammar Mistakes
 
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⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT is one of the most common mistakes that English learners make! It's so easy to forget that the verb form in English sentences changes, depending on the subject! - I AM hungry... - She IS thirsty... - They ARE fighting... - We HAVE been travelling - It HAS been so long. - She DOESN'T know... - You DON'T know... - They LIKE to travel. - She LIKES to travel. This English lesson will help you to review subject-verb agreement rules and fix your English grammar mistakes! I will also explain how these rules work in more complicated sentences. For example: sentences where the subject is a noun phrase, or where the subject and the verb are separated by a relative clause. Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/10/16/subject-verb-agreement/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id... mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRi... Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 273096 mmmEnglish
Sentence lesson 2 in English | Analysis of Sentences | English grammar tutorial
 
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There are four types of sentence structures with a view to analysis: 1) Simple Sentence 2) Compound Sentence 3) Complex Sentence 4) Compound complex Sentence A sentence can consist of a single clause or several clause.A sentence must contain at least one independent clause. 1) Simple Sentence: A simple sentence is one one which has only one subject and one predicate or we can say it has only one principal clause. As- a) An honest man is loved by all. b) The children are happy. 2) Compound Sentence:A compound sentence is made up of two or more principal clauses(independent clause).Two or more than two principal clauses are joined by co-coordinating conjunctions in the sentence;as- a) The children are happy but they want to eat ice-cream. b) The moon rose and everything looked bright. Out of the examples given above, in example no.(1)-’the children are happy’ and ‘they want to eat ice-cream’ are principal clauses.Both are joined by coordinating conjunction-’but’.Each principal clause has a subject and a predicate.Therefore, this is a compound sentence. How to identify Compound Sentences If two or more than two clauses are joined by coordinating conjunctions such as- and, as well as, but, for, nevertheless, so, still, yet, whereas, either…or, neither……..nor, not only…….but also, while, both…...and etc in a sentence, that sentence is compound sentence. 3) Complex Sentence: A complex sentence consist of one principal clause and one or more than one subordinate clauses(dependent clause).One principal clause and one or more than one subordinating clauses are joined together by subordinating conjunctions in the sentence; as- a)I have two nephews who are engineers. b) As we tried to enter the Inn, the Innkeeper said that there was no room. Out of the examples given above,in example no.(1)’I have two nephews’ is principal clause and ‘ who are engineers’ is subordinate clause which are joined by subordinating conjunction ‘who’. In example no.(2)’As we tried to enter the Inn’ is a subordinate clause because its meaning itself is not clear and ‘ that there was no room’ is also subordinate clause.Both subordinate clauses are dependent on the principal clause-’The Innkeeper said’ for their meaning. One principal clause and two subordinate clauses are joined by subordinating conjunction ‘as’ and ‘that’. How to identify Complex Sentence If two or more than two clauses are joined by subordinating conjunctions such as- as, as if, as though, as that, as long as, as much as, as soon as, as than, although, though, as far as, before , because, if, whether, who ,whom ,whose, which, what, when, how, where, till, until, unless. Etc, that sentence is complex sentence. 4) Compound Complex Sentence(Mixed sentence):This type of sentence is consist of at least two principal clauses and one subordinate clause. As- a) He went to market and brought a costly wrist watch that was stolen a few weeks later. In the above example ‘he went to market’ and ‘(he)brought a costly wrist watch’ are principal clauses. Both are joined by coordinating conjunction-’and’ and ‘that was stolen a few weeks later’ is a subordinating clause. Practice Find out the sentence type on the basis of its structure- 1) The teacher is teaching while the students are playing. 2) Home Minister is coming to visit today. 3) Rohan cried when his bit him,but he soon got better. 4) Meena was resting when the Mohan came. Once you learn it you can use it for your life time. Enjoy the lessons. If you find this video helpful for learning Analysis of sentence then please share it with friends. If you have any type of difficulties, Your quires are most welcomed. We will be happy to help you. You can put queries in comment section or message on Facebook. Check Our other Lessons and Post in below Platforms :- Website :- http://www.hellocuriousbrain.com/ Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/hellocurious... Twitter :- https://twitter.com/hicuriousbrain Youtube Channel :- https://www.youtube.com/c/hellocuriou... Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/hellocuriou... Google + :- https://plus.google.com/u/0/communiti... Pinterest :- https://in.pinterest.com/hicuriousbrain/ Whatsapp :- 7095836066 Thank You ..
Views: 1840 Curious Brain
Starting a Sentence With 'And'? Real Life Language Analysis
 
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Views: 678 mrbruff
Syntax (Part 1)
 
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A brief overview of lexical categories, phrase structure rules, and syntactic tree structures.
Views: 195204 Evan Ashworth
What is the analysis of sentence
 
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What is the analysis of sentence - Find out more explanation for : 'What is the analysis of sentence' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Views: 0 WikiAudio13
What is ontology? Introduction to the word and the concept
 
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In a philosophical context 0:28 Why ontology is important 1:08 Ontological materialism 1:34 Ontological idealism 1:59 In a non-philosophical context 2:24 Information systems 2:40 Social ontology 3:25 The word ontology comes from two Greek words: "Onto", which means existence, or being real, and "Logia", which means science, or study. The word is used both in a philosophical and non-philosophical context. ONTOLOGY IN A PHILOSOPHICAL CONTEXT In philosophy, ontology is the study of what exists, in general. Examples of philosophical, ontological questions are: What are the fundamental parts of the world? How they are related to each other? Are physical parts more real than immaterial concepts? For example, are physical objects such as shoes more real than the concept of walking? In terms of what exists, what is the relationship between shoes and walking? Why is ontology important in philosophy? Philosophers use the concept of ontology to discuss challenging questions to build theories and models, and to better understand the ontological status of the world. Over time, two major branches of philosophical ontology has developed, namely: Ontological materialism, and ontological idealism. Ontological materialism From a philosophical perspective, ontological materialism is the belief that material things, such as particles, chemical processes, and energy, are more real, for example, than the human mind. The belief is that reality exists regardless of human observers. Ontological idealism Idealism is the belief that immaterial phenomenon, such as the human mind and consciousness, are more real, for example, than material things. The belief is that reality is constructed in the mind of the observer. ONTOLOGY IN A NON-PHILOSOPHICAL CONTEXT Outside philosophy, ontology is used in a different, more narrow meaning. Here, an ontology is the description of what exist specifically within a determined field. For example, every part that exists in a specific information system. This includes the relationship and hierarchy between these parts. Unlike the philosophers, these researchers are not primarily interested in discussing if these things are the true essence, core of the system. Nor are they discussing if the parts within the system are more real compared to the processes that take place within the system. Rather, they are focused on naming parts and processes and grouping similar ones together into categories. Outside philosophy, the word ontology is also use, for example, in social ontology. Here, the idea is to describe society and its different parts and processes. The purpose of this is to understand and describe the underlying structures that affect individuals and groups. Suggested reading You can read more about ontology in some of the many articles available online, for example: http://www.streetarticles.com/science/what-is-ontology Copyright Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 237912 Kent Löfgren
Sentence Analysis
 
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What's an article?!
Views: 27 Sandra Poon
learn Moroc Arabic voc : 50 jobs + sentence analysis
 
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50 words : Jobs / professions. sentence analysis. listen and repeat. What's your job? where do you work.
Views: 1441 EasyLanguage learning
8 Common Grammar Mistakes in English!
 
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"What's the different"? "Today morning"? "I enjoyed"? Improve your grammar by correcting the common mistakes in these English sentences. A good review for all students, especially at intermediate and advanced levels. Also check our full resource of 100 Common Grammar Mistakes in English at http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ Quiz: http://www.engvid.com/8-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. In this lesson, you'll have a chance to review eight common English errors. So, let's see how you do. The first one: "Today morning I woke up late." So, what's wrong with that? There is actually something wrong with each and every one of these. I'll tell you that in advance; there's no... There are no tricks here. Okay? So, what's wrong with that sentence? "Today morning I woke up late." Well, it should be: "This morning". Okay? We don't say: "Today morning". We say: "This morning". Number two: "What's the different?" What's the different? Well, that's wrong too, because "different" is an adjective. What you want to use here is the noun. So, what's the noun of this word? "Difference". "What's the difference?" Okay? This is a really common error, so make sure you don't make this one. Next one: "I met John two years before." Okay? What's wrong with that? Well, over here, we can't say: "I met John two years before." We can say: "I met two... I met John two years ago." All right? If you use the word "before", then you have to say before something. "Before I graduated". Okay? "Before I got married", or whatever. But you can't use "before" by itself. So the proper word there is "ago". "I met John two years ago." Next one: "This is a six-months course." That sounds almost okay, but it's not okay. So the mistake here is with the "s". When we use this expression, it becomes... The entire expression becomes an adjective for the noun "course". So we should say: "This is a six-month course.", "This is a million dollar contract." And so on. Okay? That's another... Each of these is a different element of grammar, different aspect of grammar, and so on. Next, number five: "Thank you. I really enjoyed." What's wrong with that? Well, the problem is here. "Enjoyed" is a reflexive verb, so you would need to say: "I really enjoyed myself.", "I really enjoyed myself.", "He enjoyed himself.", "She enjoyed herself.", "We enjoyed ourselves.", "They enjoyed themselves." Okay? So there are certain reflexive verbs in English, and we need to use them correctly. That's one of them. Very common one. Okay, number six: "Did you loose your cellphone?" What's wrong with that? I helped you a little bit by actually showing you where the error is. So, many people make this error. This is actually a spelling mistake. You should be spelling the word this way. "Did you lose your cellphone?" "Loose" is an adjective which means not tight, and "lose" is the opposite of "find". Okay? "Did you lose your cellphone?" Also, the pronunciation is "lose" and not "loose". Next one: "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic course." So, what was wrong with what I said there? Okay? So, what was wrong was my pronunciation of that. So many people mispronounce this word. It is not "academic". It is "academic". The stress is on the middle. Academic. "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic program." Okay? So, if... In case you make that mistake. I'm not saying you do. In case you do, make sure you correct it. Last one: "Yes, I have a free time." Is that...? What's wrong there? What's going on? Okay, here. We don't need to say: "A free time". We need to say: "Free time", because this is a... Time is an uncountable noun. Now, each one of these examples represents a different aspect of grammar. So, how can you possibly learn all of them? Well, I'll give you two easy ways to help you out. One is to go to our website: www.engvid.com, because there, we have currently I think more than 700 lessons on different aspects of English grammar and of English in general for exams, for writing, speaking, all kinds of things. And by watching them, you can find the lessons that you actually need. And the other thing is that we also have... I've written actually a resource which might help you, which shows 50 such common errors that people make in English, and that might help you out as well. Okay? So, I hope you did well, and I hope you continue to do better and better in English. All the best with your English. Bye for now.
Natural Language Processing With Python and NLTK p.1 Tokenizing words and Sentences
 
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Natural Language Processing is the task we give computers to read and understand (process) written text (natural language). By far, the most popular toolkit or API to do natural language processing is the Natural Language Toolkit for the Python programming language. The NLTK module comes packed full of everything from trained algorithms to identify parts of speech to unsupervised machine learning algorithms to help you train your own machine to understand a specific bit of text. NLTK also comes with a large corpora of data sets containing things like chat logs, movie reviews, journals, and much more! Bottom line, if you're going to be doing natural language processing, you should definitely look into NLTK! Playlist link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLZvOKSCkxY&list=PLQVvvaa0QuDf2JswnfiGkliBInZnIC4HL&index=1 sample code: http://pythonprogramming.net http://hkinsley.com https://twitter.com/sentdex http://sentdex.com http://seaofbtc.com
Views: 366517 sentdex
Legal Analysis: What is the prison sentence for child molestation?
 
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In this video, we explain the penalties and sentencing for a conviction of 'lewd acts with a child' under Penal Code 288. California law makes it a felony to commit lewd acts on a minor. If the child is under 14 years of age, the sentence is 8 years of California state prison per count. If the child is 15 or 16, then the crime is a wobbler. As a misdemeanor it carries up to 1 year county jail. As a felony it carries up to 3 years prison. And conviction for child molestation or child sexual abuse under Penal Code 288 requires the offender to register for life as a sex offender. More info at http://www.shouselaw.com/lewd-conduct-minor.html
What Are In-Text Citations?
 
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This video explains what in-text citations are, why they are important, and examples of using them in instances of direct quotes and paraphrasing. Make sure to check out the MLA "quiz" from NoRedInk, linked at the end of the video!
Views: 293739 Imagine Easy Solutions
Sentence Analysis  Complex D, I
 
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Fifth graders begin a sentence analysis by identifying the parts of speech. Next they look at the parts of the sentence and then identify any phrases. In the fourth row they identify the sentence structure and the type of sentence it is.
Views: 550 Mary Beth Steven
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *it surprises you; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. 3.10. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark This tutorial showed how to focus on segments in the transcripts and how to put codes together and create categories. However, it is important to remember that it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Good luck with your study. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 640233 Kent Löfgren
Sentence Analysis Number 3
 
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5th graders analyze a sentence by looking at parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, sentence type, and finally sentence structure
Views: 290 Mary Beth Steven
Sentence | Analysis of Sentence | Types of Sentence | Basic English Grammar | E Knowledge Hub
 
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Hi everyone, This video is a thorough discussion on Sentence, Analysis of sentence ans types of sentences based on analysis. Do watch the previous video to understand this concept better. Leave your feedback or questions down below in comment box. Watch and leave your comments. Only positive vibes please....
Views: 359 E Knowledge Hub
Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay | 60second Recap®
 
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Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay, using an example from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne | Excerpt from "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide" by Jenny Sawyer. http://goo.gl/SpJhCS 0:01 Writing the thesis statement. Overview. 0:19 What you must do BEFORE you begin writing your thesis statement, 0:26 Sample assignment: from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne 0:37 Writing the thesis statement: Step One. Answer the question 1:08 Writing the thesis statement: Step Two. Refine your answer 2:10 Writing the thesis statement: Step Three. Choose the right supporting examples. 3:20 Writing the thesis statement: Step Four. Go Deeper! 3:40 Review of the sample assignment and the finalized thesis statement 4:07 Review of the four steps to a great thesis statement. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide to Acing Your Next Assignment" by Jenny Sawyer. At Amazon's Kindle Store... http://goo.gl/xobJFo WRITE AN A+ ESSAY: IT'S EASIER THAN YOU MIGHT THINK. I'm going to make a confession. I was a straight-A student in high school. I graduated summa cum laude from college. My senior thesis won the institution’s coveted essay-writing prize. Not thanks to raw brilliance, or dazzling talent. No, I knew how to write essays. You see, great essays aren’t necessarily written by the “best and brightest.” They're written by students who know the rules—from concept to thesis statement, from outline to final draft. Students who know how to get the best possible grade for the least amount of work. I’ll show you how you can, too. A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO CONQUERING YOUR NEXT ESSAY ASSIGNMENT My name is Jenny Sawyer. Over the past five years, I’ve been the girl behind 60second Recap®. I've invested thousands of hours helping teens understand classic literature. I’ve answered countless emails seeking help with essay assignments. I’ve guided individual students, one-on-one, through the process of crafting thesis statements and writing essays, testing and refining the techniques I used when I was in school. Strategies I employed to nail essay after essay. Most people think A+ essays require hours of hard work. Or genius. I’d always had a hunch they’d thought wrong. Now, I'm certain of it: YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A GENIUS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY I’ve read mediocre essays from brilliant students. Great essays from ordinary students. What sets those A+ essay-writing students apart? They know how to analyze the assignment to keep themselves on track. I’ll show you how you can, too. YOU DON’T NEED LONG HOURS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY The best essays rarely take the most time. In fact, some nearly write themselves. How? With the right kind of preparation: A+ essay-writing students organize their research and cut their workload by as much as half. I’ll show you how you can, too. FORMULAS ARE NEVER THE ANSWER, BUT... A+ essays are never formulaic. But they have a lot in commont. A+ essays start strong with crisp, provocative thesis statements. A+ essays support those thesis statements with well-chosen examples and tightly-reasoned arguments—the hallmarks of persuasive writing. A+ essays finish strong, with conclusions that locked the reader into agreement with the essay’s thesis. A+ essays are written by students working from a simple framework: the five-paragraph essay format. I’ll show you how you can, too. DON’T BE INTIMIDATED: IT’S A HEAD GAME, YOU KNOW Ready to supercharge your essay-writing process? You can when you “think like a prosecutor.” I'll show you how. I’ll also reveal the courtroom “trick” you can use to save yourself time and trouble while you craft a great thesis statement. You'll see how you can use the strategies of a criminal trial to speed you through each step of the essay-writing process, from the organization of your research, to the writing of your thesis statement, to the polish of your final draft. It’s the first time I’ve ever set this strategy to paper. Now it’s all here for you, just a click away. YOUR A+ AWAITS. CLICK THIS LINK http://goo.gl/xobJFo AND GRAB YOUR COPY OF MY STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ESSAY MASTERY
Views: 611311 60second Recap®
Analysis of sentence number 2 by KLB
 
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IN DEPTH ANALYSIS OF SENTENCE NUMBER 4
Views: 1702 søren hansen
RPSC 2nd GRADE 2018, SPOCA, sentence analysis,SVOCA, SENTENCE ANALYSIS IN TERMS OF SPOCA,
 
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We will discuss SPOCA Or SVOCA in this lesson. This is very important topic related to English language. We can analyse any sentence after learning this topic. Sentence analysis.basic sentence pattern, sentence analysis in terms of SPOCA, SVOCA, sentence analysis,analysis of sentences, sentence pattern,basic Sentence pattern,RPSC second GRADE topics
Views: 2939 Narpat Singh Sikar
Data Analysis - Sentence Meaning #2
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the meaning of three selected sentences: First, in terms of their propositions and secondly, by converting the propositions into their predications. Exercise #2 complex propositions with very simple predications.
Encore sentence analysis
 
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What's a noun?
Views: 19 Sandra Poon
Sentence Analysis
 
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Views: 34 ThatGaymerGirl
Improve Your Writing - 6 ways to compare
 
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One of the most common types of essays you will have to write at university as well as on the IELTS or TOEFL is a comparison essay. In this lesson, I will teach you some useful words that will help you to compare things. By the end of this video, you will be able to use terms such as "alike", "similar", "in the same way", "likewise", and more. Take my quiz at the end for more experience using these words. http://www.engvid.com/writing-6-ways-to-compare/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some key words you can use when you talk about how things are the same or similar. Okay? So when you compare two things -- when you're comparing apples and oranges, there are some similarities. They're both fruits. When you're comparing shopping to skiing, when you're comparing a city to a country or the countryside -- there is a certain language we like to use when we're saying how these things are similar or the same. In this video, I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions you can use when comparing two things to show their similarities. Okay? So this video is called "Talking about similarities". So for this video, I decided I wanted to do a theme. I wanted to look at how Canada and England are similar. In what ways are they very much alike? Okay? So each of my sentences are going to have to do with Canada and England, and we're going to look at how they're alike using these comparison words. So for those of you watching, if you are doing the TOEFL, these words are essential. If you are doing the IELTS -- very important vocabulary here. General English, you can use these at university for essays, college, or even just general conversation. So let's get started. Okay. So how are Canada and England the same? Well, I would say, first of all, both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have Queen Elizabeth. So one word we often use when we're talking about similarities is this word, "both". Both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have trees. Both Canada and England have cities. Okay? So there are a lot of different things you can compare. This is just one of them. Now, I want to say why I wrote the word "beginning" here. "Both" often comes at the beginning of a sentence. And notice how the construction is. We have both A and B. Another example, "Both cats and dogs are animals." "Both hamsters and mice are rodents." Okay? So we use this a lot when we're comparing. We can also say "like". In this case, we're not saying, "I like Canada" or "I like" -- you know, showing preference -- we're again showing similarity. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." Canada has many immigrants. England has many immigrants. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." And again, you'll notice "like" is at the beginning of the sentence. It's often -- not always, but often -- at the beginning. We have it followed by a noun. I could change this to something else. Imagine if I wanted to compare cats and dogs. "Like cats, dogs have fur." Okay? I could say that. If I'm comparing men and women, "Like women, men are human." Okay? It's not the greatest of comparisons, but you can use these types of words when you're comparing. Okay? So now, I have some other things I want to compare. In England, they speak English. In Canada, we also speak English. Not everybody, but many Canadians speak English. Some speak French, but a lot of people speak English. So I'm going to teach you some words you can use when comparing these two sentences. "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English, too. In comparison, in Canada many people also speak English. In the same way, in Canada many people speak English." And finally, another way similar to this but slightly different, "Likewise, in Canada many people speak English." So these are a little bit different from these ones. They all mean how they are the same. But you'll notice one of the differences here is these are followed by a comma. "Likewise, comma." And then, we have the rest of the sentence. These go at the beginning of the sentence. Okay? In case you can't tell, this is a period. So we have our first sentence, "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English." Okay? So you can use these in your writing. They would really, really help on your TOEFL, IELTS, or university essays to help you get a better mark.
Data Analysis - Sentence Meaning #4
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the meaning of three selected sentences: First, in terms of their propositions and secondly, by converting the propositions into their predications. Exercise #4 involves simple propositions with quantification, here the integration of the universal quantifier.
Montessori 3-6, Indirect Object, Sentence Analysis
 
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Doing this work, a child will get an understanding of what an Objective is, by being introduced to an Indirect Object. This is an interesting, even so not common appearance. A child will have knowledge about The Verb (red ball) and have had the first sentence analyses presentation of Transitive/ Intransitive Verb.
Views: 177 karin Montessori
Van Breda appeals sentence - analysis
 
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Criminal law expert Tyrone Maseko talks to us about what could happen in Van Breda case. Courtesy#dstv403
Views: 741 eNCA
Data Analysis - Sentence Meaning #5
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the meaning of three selected sentences: First, in terms of their propositions and secondly, by converting the propositions into their predications. Exercise #5 involves simple propositions with quantification, here the integration of the existential quantifier.
Data Analysis - Sentence Meaning #3
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the meaning of three selected sentences: First, in terms of their propositions and secondly, by converting the propositions into their predications. Exercise #3 involves complex propositions without quantification.
How Donald Trump Answers A Question
 
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HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter VISIT WISECRACK HERE: http://bit.ly/1xPTaB7 TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: thener[email protected] SOURCES: Barton Swaim, “How Donald Trump’s language works for him” (via The Washington Post) September 15, 2015 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/09/15/how-trump-speak-has-pushed-the-donald-into-first-place/ Emily Atkin, “What Language Experts Find So Strange About Donald Trump” (via ThinkProgress) 2015 http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2015/09/15/3701215/donald-trump-talks-funny-2/ Matt Viser, “For presidential hopefuls, simpler language resonates” (via The Boston Globe) October 20, 2015 https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2015/10/20/donald-trump-and-ben-carson-speak-grade-school-level-that-today-voters-can-quickly-grasp/LUCBY6uwQAxiLvvXbVTSUN/story.html Jack Shafer, “Donald Trump Talks Like a Third-Grader” (via Politico) 2015 http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/donald-trump-talks-like-a-third-grader-121340 ALL THE MUSIC COMES FROM HERE: https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday
Views: 7936807 Nerdwriter1
Sentence Analysis Grade 5 Part 2
 
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5th Grade students analyze a sentence in four layers: parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, sentence type, and sentence structure. Parts of speech are identified in part 1. All of the rest is identified in part 2.
Views: 483 Mary Beth Steven
Sentence Analysis - 4 Level
 
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Fifth graders analyze a sentence by identifying parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, and clauses.
Views: 286 Mary Beth Steven
This linguist studied the way Trump speaks for two years. Here’s what she found.
 
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Jennifer Sclafani, a linguist at Georgetown University, says President Trump is a “unique” politician because he doesn’t speak like one. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qiJ4dy Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
Views: 1368714 Washington Post
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 747258 Kevin deLaplante
Sentence Analysis - 4 Level
 
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Fifth graders analyze a sentence. First, parts of speech are identified. Second, parts of the sentence are identified. Third, phrases are identified. Fourth, the sentence type and sentence structure are identified.
Views: 2762 Mary Beth Steven
Sentence Analysis from The Jabberwocky
 
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Fifth graders analyze the first sentence of The Jabberwocky.
Views: 4451 Mary Beth Steven
How to Make a Text Summarizer - Intro to Deep Learning #10
 
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I'll show you how you can turn an article into a one-sentence summary in Python with the Keras machine learning library. We'll go over word embeddings, encoder-decoder architecture, and the role of attention in learning theory. Code for this video (Challenge included): https://github.com/llSourcell/How_to_make_a_text_summarizer Jie's Winning Code: https://github.com/jiexunsee/rudimentary-ai-composer More Learning resources: https://www.quora.com/Has-Deep-Learning-been-applied-to-automatic-text-summarization-successfully https://research.googleblog.com/2016/08/text-summarization-with-tensorflow.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_summarization http://deeplearning.net/tutorial/rnnslu.html http://machinelearningmastery.com/text-generation-lstm-recurrent-neural-networks-python-keras/ Please subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Follow me: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval/
Views: 126822 Siraj Raval
Fifth Grade Sentence Analysis (infinitive phrases)
 
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Sentence Analysis with infinitive phrases and prepositional phrases.
Views: 233 Mary Beth Steven
Analysis of sentence brought against editor of El Universo
 
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The journalist Rodolfo Muñoz offers an analysis of the sentence brought against the former editor of the newspaper "El Universo" in Ecuador. The sentence against the former editor has caused controversy in Ecuador and has been criticized by the Ecuadorean Association of Newspaper Editors, which accuses the government of manipulating the legal system. http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/en/26/7/2011/43338/analysis-of-sentence-brought-against-editor-of-el-universo/
Views: 30 TeleSUR English
Sentence Analysis w/compound predicate
 
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Harvey's Sentence Analysis methodology with Reed Kellog Diagrams.
Views: 545 BreWtHeLeSSeR